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sulfur


kyle32123
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A few questions..

 

I know you can make H2SO4 from SO3 and water and that it is dangerous, i wanted to find out how to make the SO3 form (sulfur) if it is possible, I know that this has been brought up before i just wanted a more in depth explanation on how to make SO3 and why its so hard.

 

 

Also could anyone please tell me the products of this equation i get a bunch of different things for some reason?

 

Na2O5S2 + H2O2 --->

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I was really interested in seeing if you can make SO3 form straight sulfur

 

you can but you need high temperatures/pressures and a expensive catalyst, not too mention the expensive equipment.

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its SO2, when you add sodium metabusulfite to water it creates SO2. that will burn also, but so3 would burn alot more. If SO3 was created it would immideatly dissolve in the water and it wouldnt reach ur nostrils anyway.

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Cause i figured if i take the sodium metadisulfate and add the h2o2 in a stoppered flask and run the tubing to a beaker of water and collect it that way, i thought the SO2 would react with the water and make H2SO3 but thats just me taking a guess.

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If you mix up Na2S2O5 and H2O2 you don't get SO2, but NaHSO4 in solution. With excess Na2S2O5 you will get SO2 and indeed that has a pungent odour. The bubbles you saw, however, most likely are oxygen from decomposing H2O2.

 

Budullewraag, SO2 is very soluble. It will be quite hard to get any SO2 from an aqueous solution. You just get the smell, but gas at reasonable purity requires more than just adding some bisulfite to an aqueous solution. SO2 is not as soluble as NH3 and HCl, but still is is soluble quite well.

 

You can make gaseous SO2 by adding a bisulfite to a strong concentrated acid (preferrably H2SO4). From conc. HCl you can make it, but it requires heating to drive of the gas.

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SO2 is not necessarily particularly soluble. The reaction will increase the temperature of the water, causing the SO2 to become less soluble in the water. Yes, at 25 celsius, SO2 may dissolve 9.4 grams (approximately 0.147 moles) in 100mL of water, but that number decreases rapidly with temperature increase, almost halving (5.0g/100mL or approximately 0.078 moles/100mL) at 50 celsius. The enthalpy from the oxidation of sulfur from sulfite to sulfate should be sufficient to make SO2 significantly less soluble than at room temperature unless we are to consider consider very dilute solutions.

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so your saying if the mixture is 50/50 ill get the sodium metadisulfate in solution if if i add any extra like 60/40 ill get SO2?

No, I did not say precisely this. I do not know the precise figures where you will get gaseous SO2. At a certain concentration of acid, you will get gaseous SO2, and the higher the concentration, the more gaseous SO2.

 

With a 50/50 mixture of conc. H2SO4 and water, together with some heating, you will be capable of getting some SO2 gas.

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a sulpher candle under an open topped bell jar, with a fish tank air pump providing the IN for the O2 and a bleed pipe for the SO2 out works great for me (both pipes go through the cork that seals the top), and it`s SO Simple! :)

you can do the same with Phosphorus too.

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