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Use of Calculus in Electrical Engineering

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I am doing a project for my calculus class in which we give a presentation about a career that utilizes calculus. I chose Electrical Engineering.

 

Can anyone provide some examples of how EE uses calculus? I know a lot of formulas are used, but I'm sure some of these must have been derived using calculus. Aren't Maxwell's Equations used in EE?

 

A few examples or just general cases that I can research further would be helpful. Than you!

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I am doing a project for my calculus class in which we give a presentation about a career that utilizes calculus. I chose Electrical Engineering.

 

Can anyone provide some examples of how EE uses calculus? I know a lot of formulas are used, but I'm sure some of these must have been derived using calculus. Aren't Maxwell's Equations used in EE?

 

A few examples or just general cases that I can research further would be helpful. Than you!

 

Maxwell's equations are a great example. However, if you're doing a calculus project, they may be a bit complicated (not sure when you learn to integrate vectors). Check out wikipedia for some great insight into Maxwell's Equations:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations

 

Most EE programs will have an entire semester devoted to just these equations, so don't feel so bad if they don't make sense immediately.

 

Perhaps it would be best to do something a little easier and more elementary like Kirchoff's Voltage Law (a freshman-sophomore level topic in EE):

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirchoff%27s_current_law

 

This is often referred to as KVL. Basically, it says that if you have a closed path in a circuit (makes a circle back on itself), the integral of the Electric Field along that path is zero. In other words, the net voltage around any loop in a circuit is zero.

 

I'm not sure your knowledge of voltage/current, but basically Voltage is how much power is in the punch of the electricity, and Current is how many times/how quickly you get punched.

 

Hope this helps

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