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building a computer


taylrl
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I am thinking about building my own computer, i have what i would call an intermediate understanding of computers but want to know more.

 

Having never built a computer, but seen a friend do it, it seems relativley straight forward. How difficult is it to link to processors to work in parrallel, is it stupidly difficult and am i being stupid by even thinking it could be a possibility on my first self-built computer.

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that`s not Building a computer! that`s System Integration, you`ll need a Solding Iron to Build your own computer! :P

 

Thus, why you have a large post count.

 

I think you need WINDOWS 2000 for parallel...

 

Otherwise:

 

Anyways, here's the deal.

 

Build a computer can be easy.

However, there is some math involved.

 

A lot of manufactures these days teach people how to put stuff in somewhat because of documentation that comes with hardware.

 

However, you have to understand what you want inside of the computer

 

If you have a basic understanding, you know that the obvious compents are:

 

- Sound card

- Video card

- Disk drive

- CD Drive

 

The ports of a computer are often found on the motherboard; They are soldered on.

 

Most people get confused about the box, motherboard, and powersupply

 

The best thing you can do is get the box, motherboard, and powersupply altogether. As one package..

 

You may or may not be able to do so.

 

There is often a standard "box" (case) people put PCI cards in.

 

The best thing you can do is walk into a computer store and hit the technical guy up for answers.

 

These guys sometimes work on a quota so they will be willing to "help you" (actually they want to sell it more importantly) and help you figure out what you need to buy.

 

Ask them about what type of box you need.

 

- What type of box should I use? (You may find one fancy) if so..

- What type of motherboard does the case use?

- What type of RAM sticks should I use?

- What do you think is the best CPU to use at a decent price for this motherboard?

- Do I need a 240v PSU or 120v PSU? (depends on nation/country/etc.)

 

Building a computer is somewhat complex because there are hard things to understand. First off, the computer guy could give you everything you want, but he may sell you the most expensive stuff.

 

That's why you've got to understand a few terms and concepts:

 

- RAM (DDRAM) I'm behind, I haven't built a computer in about a year.

- Cache

- CPU (will it be the best for this motherboard?) I think it's AMD (right?) they one the battle?

 

There is usually a lot more, which is why I suggest some more people here throw out serious things. Those are some of the basics, though.

 

THE MOST IMPORTANT CONCEPT:

Don't shock the shit out of your equipment when you put it in.

There's a joke where people will put computer stuff in naked.

I simply control my movement when I'm on carpet.

 

Other people buy the wriststrap shock asorbers (most common thing to do)

I suggest you buy one, it has its handiness if you want to do more electronic stuff in the future, something fun to invest in.

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Thus' date=' why you have a large post count.

[/quote']

 

indeed!, infact a significant proportion of my posting has been at Logic Gate level and boolean algebra theory and also IC types and wiring as well as Electronics in general in order to make real that which performs on paper at a number level.

well spotted :)

 

as for system integration (Ikea Flat-packs), Well...

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YT: Nothing wrong with putting a system together, better than paying for someone else to do it. Just because not everyone can make a processor for themselves, and even you can't make a dual core 3.2GHz one!

 

insane_alien: Or you could just touch the metal case occasionally, that's what I do.

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indeed!' date=' infact a significant proportion of my posting has been at Logic Gate level and boolean algebra theory and also IC types and wiring as well as Electronics in general in order to make real that which performs on paper at a number level.

well spotted :)

 

as for system integration (Ikea Flat-packs), Well...[/quote']

 

Come on YT2095, you got to be less lenient on the novice. Self-building a computer is not too hard. I have been building computers for the last 4 to 5 years, and um, the most parts are:

 

1) Motherboard

2) CPU (along with Heat cooler)

3) Power box

4) CD-ROM

5) Floppy Disk drive (not a mandatory)

6) Hard Drive

7) RAM

8) Ribbons (They are used to connect the Hard Drive, CD-ROM, Floppy Drive to the motherboard).

9) A special black wire to connect the CD-ROM to the Motherboard.

10) Screwdrivers of course!!

 

Good luck. You can find the parts in a thrift store or pawn shop for cheaper price.

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You don't need "ribbons" aka IDE (or PATA) cables. You can just use the newer, quicker and better SATA cables to connect hard drives. SATA cables are thin cables! Not like the fat (or wide, depending on how you look at it) ribbons that used to be so popular.

 

Here's a pic showing the difference:

http://www.maadiran.com/persian/IMAGES/sata-pata.jpg

(IDE or PATA left.... SATA right)

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You don't need "ribbons" aka IDE (or PATA) cables. You can just use the newer' date=' quicker and better SATA cables to connect hard drives. SATA cables are thin cables! Not like the fat (or wide, depending on how you look at it) ribbons that used to be so popular.

 

Here's a pic showing the difference:

http://www.maadiran.com/persian/IMAGES/sata-pata.jpg

[i'](IDE or PATA left.... SATA right)[/i]

 

 

 

Optical drives still very often use PATA ...

 

And one non-magnetic phillips screwdriver should do it...

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Never seen a SATA before. I have been fixing computers in school for 2 years now and I have seeing the PATA cables all the time. Guess I'm not updated with modern computer technology. :embarass: But then again, I assume those SATA cables are more expensive than PATA cables right? Also, how does the hell PATA cables would fit the slots in the motherboard? It has to be wide to fit in the slots?

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Never seen a SATA before. I have been fixing computers in school for 2 years now and I have seeing the PATA cables all the time. Guess I'm not updated with modern computer technology. :embarass: But then again, I assume those SATA cables are more expensive than PATA cables right? Also, how does the hell PATA cables would fit the slots in the motherboard? It has to be wide to fit in the slots?

 

 

I guess you mean how dose SATA fit?

 

Well you need a motherboard (or a PCI card that does the same thing) with SATA slots on it, you also need a SATA hard disk/optical drive, these are both normally slightly more expencive but the price difference is slowely disapearing...

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SATA is relatively new technologies. Many companies (incl. schools) have not upgraded because, like Klaynos said, it requires totaly new hardware and the benefits are not big enough to make it a good value for money upgrade.

 

However if you buy a new computer it will almost certainly have the new SATA connection.

 

Here is a useful PATA vs SATA comparison table:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v601/5614/patavssata.jpg

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Im building a high performance pc now also. The hard disk will be SATA. I do not see how any of you dont know what sata is. Its not new technology. Dell home pc's ship standard with SATA drives.

 

 

So basicaly i dont see whats so hard about building a computer.

 

You basicaly buy all your parts neccessary/ Install the power supply.

 

Then the motherboard. Then the processor and the fansink.

then the drives. THen the add on cards. Keepp yourself grounded by often touvhing the case chassis.

 

After you install your motherboard and before anything else, you may want to consider conencting all your case things to your mobo, like your piezo buzzer, power swith, audio, usb, firewire....fans and all your other mods and crap. Make sure everythings good, pluged in and secure. press the power button and hope it boots.

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If anything I'd say that hardest part is ensuring (before you buy it) that all of your parts are compatable with each other.

 

Once you have all the bits as H2SO4 says, it's just a case of plug this into this and that into that and you're done.

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I've found the easiest way to do it is to choose what type of CPU you want followed by the type of graphics card (basically that's just AGP or PCI-E). From there you can find the appropriate motherboard and the rest is usually plain sailing.

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