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fafalone

Poll: MD or DO

Which is a better degree?  

1 member has voted

  1. 1. Which is a better degree?

    • Allopathic (MD)
      18
    • Osteopath (DO)
      10
    • They're the same
      35


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Yea, from what I understand an osteopath in the UK or other countries is different than an osteopath in the states. Here in the states they go through the standard physician's training. 4 years undergrad, 4 years med school, 1 year internship, 3 year residency (varies from 3-8 years, depending on specialty).

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As far as osteopathic schools: Kirksville COM, Michigan State COM, maybe Ohio State. Can't remember which one is 3rd ranked for primary care. I'll apply to a few others as well, only the ones in big cities. Philidelphia COM, NYITCOM...

 

I don't know if I'm going to apply allopathic yet, so havn't really looked around there.

 

What about you?

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I will probably go to grad school first. Then decide from there. I am just curious about where other people desire to go.

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Guest drp

I'm an MD. But I remember a DO hospital bringing my father thru a heart attack just fine...

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Guest fullefect1

I am almost positive that a D.O. is actually considered a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States, not a Doctor of Osteopathy. I believe that the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy is the degree that is given in the UK, and in some other foreign countries, which is sometimes what causes some confussion over this subject. I have read that these Degrees that are obtained in other countries are only good for using OMM, which is only a small portion of what a D.O. from this country would use. This makes the D.O. from the US, a completed differnt profession from other counties D.O.'s. As stated by blike, D.O.'s in this country can be specialized in anything they want to, but I believe it is around 75% of them do primary care.

 

For some members saying that Institutions such as Harvard, JHU, and other top name schools are superior in education, I would defenitely agree if we were talking about the research end of these schools. In primary field positions, the USNews rankings is putting a D.O. program in the top 10 (I believe). But everyone knows that these rankings are not completely accurate. In the last several years though, many of the graduating D.O. students have turned away from specializing in the primary care fields, mostly I believe it is because they have $250,000 of loans to pay off.

 

Living in Mass, there are many Internal Medicine doctors that graduated from University of New England (D.O. school) that are excellent physicians. I actually think my brothers primary care doctor fits into the category.

 

Myself being someone who is interested in persueing a medical degree, I am going to aim for M.D. granting institutions first, because of the advantage of more oppurtunities in specialty fields such as Orthopedics,and other hard residencies to obtain.

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