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Rosemary

How gravity would act upon a black hole

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So this has probably been figured out, but being a lowley 7th grader, I do not have access to that. I do not know the math to be able to show how gravity would fit in with the EM, strong, and weak forces, but at least this would show how gravity would act upon a black hole;

 

Gravitational Force=Mass x Radius

 

When object 1 has a greater Gravitational Force (GF), than object 2, object 1 will pull object 2 into orbit, when it is acting over a vacuum.

 

With something like the sun and the solar system, the sun's GF would only have to be greater than each of the planets to pull them into orbit.

 

When there are 3 objects, and object 1 has a bigger mass than objects 2 and 3, and object 2 has a bigger mass than object 3, object 1 will pull them both in, though object 3 will be pulled somewhat to object 2.

 

Gravitational Force- The amount of force that gravity can exert upon an object. It would cause it to be pulled closer together.

 

In something as small, and with as little mass as an atom, gravity has almost no effect, because the mass of an atom is tiny, as is the radius. With something like a black hole, the radius is tiny, but the mass is so huge that gravity would still have a strong effect on it.

 

So how completely wrong is it?

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In something as small' date=' and with as little mass as an atom, gravity has almost no effect, because the mass of an atom is tiny, as is the radius. With something like a black hole, the radius is tiny, but the mass is so huge that gravity would still have a strong effect on it.

 

So how completely wrong is it?[/quote']

 

Corect, gravity is such a weak force with comparison too other forces that it has little (nearly none) effect on small particles.

 

With a black hole you have an infinate density compacted into a space that is infinatly small, the radius is indeed very small and its gravity is infinate... its this that causes the equations fo relativity to break down and inspired the search for a theory to combine the two in an attempt to "see into the singularity".

 

Just to prove how weak gravity is,you can list a cup off a table despite the fact that all of the Earth is pulling upon the cup.

When you jump off a high building and hit the floor the forces holding the atoms together (the intermolecular forces) are more than able to stop you from passing through the planet! Proves just hoe weak gravity is compared to the other forces...

 

Cheers,

 

Ryan Jones

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Gravitational Force=Mass x Radius

[math]F_G=-G\frac{m_1m_2}{r^2}[/math]

When object 1 has a greater Gravitational Force (GF)' date=' than object 2, object 1 will pull object 2 into orbit, when it is acting over a vacuum.[/quote']the force is equal on both objects.

In something as small, and with as little mass as an atom, gravity has almost no effect, because the mass of an atom is tiny, as is the radius. With something like a black hole, the radius is tiny, but the mass is so huge that gravity would still have a strong effect on it.

the smaller the radius, the greater the force.

 

So how completely wrong is it?

pretty wrong, but we all start somewhere. stick with it.

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