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Gallons/Quarts


KlingGeofrey
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My son’s 3rd grade math is always asking him questions about measurements and equivalents. He always comes and asks me for help when there are questions like: How many quarts in a gallon? (A gallon is equal to 4 quarts) How many cups are in a gallon? (There are 16 cups in a gallon)  How many cups in a pint? (There are 2 cups in a pint) How many cups are in a quart? (4) When I taught foods classes at a high school, these measurements always seem to be a challenge, too! Someone have a fun and easy way to help teach these measurements?

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41 minutes ago, KlingGeofrey said:

My son’s 3rd grade math is always asking him questions about measurements and equivalents. He always comes and asks me for help when there are questions like: How many quarts in a gallon? (A gallon is equal to 4 quarts) How many cups are in a gallon? (There are 16 cups in a gallon)  How many cups in a pint? (There are 2 cups in a pint) How many cups are in a quart? (4) When I taught foods classes at a high school, these measurements always seem to be a challenge, too! Someone have a fun and easy way to help teach these measurements?

No. Move to Europe, where these silly antiquated measures are not used.😁 

More seriously, I went to school in the UK during the transition to metric units and had to learn both at school. If you live in a benighted country with these ancient systems, you just have to learn them, I'm afraid.

P.S. I never knew a "cup" was an actual measure. We had to learn gills, quarts and gallons. It seems there are 2 gills in a cup. So I've learnt something today.  

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1 hour ago, KlingGeofrey said:

Someone have a fun and easy way to help teach these measurements?

You had the answer right there. Food! Put it in practical context. Recipes in books and even sometimes on line come with both kind of measurement. It helps to have actual containers and weights in the classroom, but if that's not practical, the teacher can have children find a recipe for something they really like to eat, and compare quantities: What if we used two quarts of milk instead of two cups? How much flour would we need? How big would the cake be? Have them rolling in the aisles. And remembering: funny things stick better than boring things. 

I was lucky to be burdened with both the English and metric systems in high school (the American discrepancies were mentioned, too) because metric was required for the science and tech courses we might go on to, but the commercial measures were British. Lucky because, ten years later when Canada went officially metric, my cohort was not gob-smacked by decimals. Amazing how many people had trouble adjusting to simple, consistent 10's from those crazy irrational fractions.  (To this day, I snarl every time somebody uses the word 'decimate' for wholesale destruction.)

Edited by Peterkin
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1 hour ago, KlingGeofrey said:

My son’s 3rd grade math is always asking him questions about measurements and equivalents. He always comes and asks me for help when there are questions like: How many quarts in a gallon? (A gallon is equal to 4 quarts) How many cups are in a gallon? (There are 16 cups in a gallon)  How many cups in a pint? (There are 2 cups in a pint) How many cups are in a quart? (4) When I taught foods classes at a high school, these measurements always seem to be a challenge, too! Someone have a fun and easy way to help teach these measurements?

Make a document, print it out, and place in toilet in visible place from WC..

 

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