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Jarlesberg Cheese


studiot
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Never heard of Jarlsberg cheese.
But I love cheese, and having naturally low cholesteral levels, often eat it to the point of constipation.

I used to drink two quarts of milk per day when younger, but now as little as a few ounces with cereal, gives me bad gas and stomach cramps.

I have heard of ( and tried often ) Carlsberg beer.

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8 hours ago, Peterkin said:

So why didn't they plug in the ordinary cheddars and mozzarellas  people can actually afford to eat on a daily basis?

Jarlsberg is the biggest imported cheese in the US according to wiki. It's probably cheap enough over there, but we get ripped off over here. It amazes me what people pay for foreign cheese in the UK, when we have the two best cheeses in the world made here at a fraction of the price. 

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5 minutes ago, mistermack said:

Jarlsberg is the biggest imported cheese in the US according to wiki. It's probably cheap enough over there, but we get ripped off over here.

It may be cheaper here, but all gourmet items have gone up so much lately that it's tough to figure accurately. Many imported cheese prices have pegged somewhere around $17.99/pound, which seems to be the point where Americans question their love. A couple of years ago, Jarlsberg was about $11/pound when other Swiss cheese is about $7-8/pound.

14 minutes ago, mistermack said:

It amazes me what people pay for foreign cheese in the UK, when we have the two best cheeses in the world made here at a fraction of the price. 

One of my favorite cheeses they promote in my local stores is called Cotswold, a double Gloucester with chives and onion they claim is from the UK. Is this a real English cheese, or is this like English muffins over here?

 

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4 minutes ago, Phi for All said:

It may be cheaper here, but all gourmet items have gone up so much lately that it's tough to figure accurately. Many imported cheese prices have pegged somewhere around $17.99/pound, which seems to be the point where Americans question their love. A couple of years ago, Jarlsberg was about $11/pound when other Swiss cheese is about $7-8/pound.

One of my favorite cheeses they promote in my local stores is called Cotswold, a double Gloucester with chives and onion they claim is from the UK. Is this a real English cheese, or is this like English muffins over here?

 

Having run the Cooper hill cheese race, a round of "double Gloucester" is well worth the effort... 😉

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14 minutes ago, Phi for All said:

One of my favorite cheeses they promote in my local stores is called Cotswold, a double Gloucester with chives and onion they claim is from the UK. Is this a real English cheese, or is this like English muffins over here?

Well, Double Gloucester is an old English cheese, very popular, with quite a lot of variations on the basic theme. And Gloucester is an historic Costwold city. ( the cotswold hills are overlooking) . So it's a popular variation, (popular here too). 

Have you ever seen the annual cheese rolling? It's an absolutely mental race down a very steep hill, chasing a Double Gloucester cheese. It takes pace about four miles from where I live :   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6hiCbK2T-8

 

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You must be snobs.. I stopped buying "normal" cheese (e.g. Gouda, Emmentaler, Radamer etc.) (and cured meats too) when they went from $5.1/kg ($2.3/lb) to $7.7/kg ($3.5/lb) this year, as it is too high..

Instead, I prefer to buy more chuck steak for $4.7/kg ($2.1/lb), cheaper and more nutritive.. 1 kg potatoes, onion, and there is food for entire day for ~$3/day. Today will have also special soup soured (fermented rye starter) for $0.5/plate. And thinking about starting making such sour soup by myself to limit costs.


Sourdough for sour soup:

Spoiler

Sourdough for sour soup - ingredients:

- 5 tablespoons of rye flour 2000
- 500-700 ml of water
- 4 cloves of garlic
- 3 bay leaves
- 5 grains of allspice
Sourdough for sour soup - preparation:

1. I put flour in a jar, add water and garlic cloves cut in half.
2 I mix thoroughly, get the leaves and allspice. I cover the jar with gauze or linen cloth and leave it on the counter for a few days.
3) If I want to speed up fermentation I add a tablespoon of sourdough for bread or a tablespoon of pickle juice.
4) I stir the sourdough starter every day. When it smells and tastes sour it is a sign that it is ready. I pour the sourdough into a bottle and keep it in the refrigerator.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

(so it is simply the same procedure as with pickled cucumbers, but flour instead of cucumbers)

 

ps. Anyone here have a cow to borrow? We can also make some experimental cheese..

 

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I would think the high menaquinone content is key to the better mineral uptake with Jarlsberg.  Evidence keeps piling up for K2 as a bone density protector.  Somewhat whimsical, the science thread turning into a cheese pricing lamentation.  Perhaps transport prices could be reduced (and carbon footprint, as well) by converting all hard cheeses into wheels and rolling them to market?

 

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Love the Jarlsberg cheese :) Trying not to eat too much cheese generally - need to keep tabs on the weight and all. But I guess now I have an excuse to eat a little more of it now and then.

13 hours ago, Peterkin said:

So why didn't they plug in the ordinary cheddars and mozzarellas  people can actually afford to eat on a daily basis? 

I don't usually buy cheddar or mozarella - don't like them very much. But as far as I remember the price of mozarella, we have Jarlsberg priced pretty much the same. That said, almost any kind of cheese here is ridiculously expensive, so that doesn't really help.

 

PS: my first post here had to be about cheese :D 

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1 hour ago, TheVat said:

Perhaps transport prices could be reduced (and carbon footprint, as well) by converting all hard cheeses into wheels and rolling them to market?

Where's yours arriving from? Mine - likely gouda or chevre, just have to roll some 30 Km down a gentle grade; probably won't go fast enough to kill anyone. 

I'd still like a study that's more income-inclusive. 

 

Edited by Peterkin
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18 minutes ago, Peterkin said:

Where's yours arriving from? Mine - likely gouda or chevre, just have to roll some 30 Km down a gentle grade

Not the transport price you need to worry about.
The tariffs Canada imposes on cheap, but good, American cheeses, in an effort to 'protect' the Quebec dairy racket ( and one of the reason D Trump went after NAFTA ), is what keeps our prices high.

Best prices on imported "Parmeggiano Reggiano", in Canada, is Costco.
( I like hard cheeses, with crusty Italian bread, and 'Amarone' wine )

Edited by MigL
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5 hours ago, mistermack said:

Have you ever seen the annual cheese rolling? It's an absolutely mental race down a very steep hill, chasing a Double Gloucester cheese. It takes pace about four miles from where I live :   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6hiCbK2T-8

6 hours ago, dimreepr said:

Having run the Cooper hill cheese race, a round of "double Gloucester" is well worth the effort... 😉

Is this the same event? That's hilarious! Come to think of it, I've seen some DG with the name Somerdale Cooper Hill. 

3 hours ago, Sensei said:

You must be snobs..

Yes. I stopped buying cheap food and started buying less food overall, but all top quality.

1 hour ago, sergio said:

PS: my first post here had to be about cheese :D 

Start another cheese thread in Physics or Biology!

1 hour ago, MigL said:

Best prices on imported "Parmeggiano Reggiano", in Canada, is Costco.
( I like hard cheeses, with crusty Italian bread, and 'Amarone' wine )

Hard cheeses are what the cardiologists all recommend, and I agree with you on that Costco parm. You're talking about the big wedge, right, not the pre-shredded?

I suppose I could cut it down to Jarlsberg only, as long as I get some sort of official medical exemption in writing. Maybe a bracelet with a big J in the middle of a red cross or something. And I definitely want a senior discount at the store when I buy my dairy medications.

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Thanks all I'm glad folks have foun cud to chew about in this thread.

Just a note to our newcomers.

A couple of years ago I went to the Frome Internatinal Cheese Festival, and we had a longish discussion about cheese and some interesting photographs and cartoons.

I also posted another thread about a zero fat cheese  - basically solid protein.

 

Does anyone remember either ?

Edited by studiot
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@studiot due to your thread I spend over an one hour watching tutorials "how to make cheese at home".. there are even companies selling what we need (which is basically a "microbial starter kit" and "microbial rennet enzyme", the rest of the equipment I can print on a 3D printer, just have to reverse-engineer them). From 10 L of milk we can get 1 kg of cheese, and some more ricotta cheese.

Edited by Sensei
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10 minutes ago, Sensei said:

@studiot due to your thread I spend over an one hour watching tutorials "how to make cheese at home".. there are even companies selling what we need (which is basically a "microbial starter kit" and "microbial rennet enzyme", the rest of the equipment I can print on a 3D printer, just have to reverse-engineer them). From 10 L of milk we can get 1 kg of cheese, and some more ricotta cheese.

:)  +1

It's a while since I had a rennet pudding.

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6 hours ago, Sensei said:

 

  Reveal hidden contents

Sourdough for sour soup - ingredients:

- 5 tablespoons of rye flour 2000
- 500-700 ml of water
- 4 cloves of garlic
- 3 bay leaves
- 5 grains of allspice
Sourdough for sour soup - preparation:

1. I put flour in a jar, add water and garlic cloves cut in half.
2 I mix thoroughly, get the leaves and allspice. I cover the jar with gauze or linen cloth and leave it on the counter for a few days.
3) If I want to speed up fermentation I add a tablespoon of sourdough for bread or a tablespoon of pickle juice.
4) I stir the sourdough starter every day. When it smells and tastes sour it is a sign that it is ready. I pour the sourdough into a bottle and keep it in the refrigerator.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

(so it is simply the same procedure as with pickled cucumbers, but flour instead of cucumbers)

 

ps. Anyone here have a cow to borrow? We can also make some experimental cheese..

 

No, but I used to have goats and I tried my own cheese. Ended up eating a 1 kilo block of Brie by myself, when no one else was willing to try. 

Nice! 

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3 hours ago, naitche said:

No, but I used to have goats and I tried my own cheese. Ended up eating a 1 kilo block of Brie by myself, when no one else was willing to try. 

"Practice makes master"

and

"It is better to try and fail than not to try at all"..

 

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On 8/19/2022 at 12:36 PM, Sensei said:

"Practice makes master"

and

"It is better to try and fail than not to try at all"..

 

My cheddar was the fail, turned out like a block of sour milk. The only difference was a swipe of the culture from the wrapping of a brie before it was cured.

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