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can anyone help to interpret amylose spectra?


miqif
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Can I borrow your rotating microscope ?

You will get more help if you

1) Post a large enough trace to read

2) Post it the right way up

3) Post any thought you already have as to identifying the peaks ?

This is, after all, a university level question.

 

Edited by studiot
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In carbohydrate chemistry, my suggestion is generally to start with the HC-1 signal, because it verifies the configuration of this carbon.  It is also simpler in appearance.

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Posted (edited)

Amylose is a type of starch that is found in plants and grains. Amylose is also known as amylopectin.

In order to interpret amylose spectra, the sample should be heated to about 100 degrees Celsius for about 10 minutes. It should then be cooled down to room temperature before it can be analyzed.

There are three primary methods of analyzing amylose spectra:

  • The iodine test: This test uses iodine as a reagent and changes the color of the starch sample depending on how much amylose it has.
  • The iodine-sulfur test: This test uses an iodine-sulfur solution as a reagent and changes the color of the starch sample depending on how much amylose it has.
  • The starch iodine test: This test uses starch as a reagent and changes the color of the sample depending on how much amylose it has.

Is this your chemistry homework?

Edited by Phi for All
sneaky url removed
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6 hours ago, John Ryan said:

Amylose is a type of starch that is found in plants and grains. Amylose is also known as amylopectin.

In order to interpret amylose spectra, the sample should be heated to about 100 degrees Celsius for about 10 minutes. It should then be cooled down to room temperature before it can be analyzed.

There are three primary methods of analyzing amylose spectra:

  • The iodine test: This test uses iodine as a reagent and changes the color of the starch sample depending on how much amylose it has.
  • The iodine-sulfur test: This test uses an iodine-sulfur solution as a reagent and changes the color of the starch sample depending on how much amylose it has.
  • The starch iodine test: This test uses starch as a reagent and changes the color of the sample depending on how much amylose it has.

Is this your chemistry homework?

John, if you are a student, as you represented yourself as being earlier, the first rule is RTFQ, Read The ----ing Question. This thread is about interpreting NMR spectra.

But I'm wondering now if you are a 'bot, because of your inane suggestion that you can analyse a spectrum by wet chemistry methods.  

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