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Why does an electric car needs so many more chips than an IC car?


TheVat
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8 minutes ago, zapatos said:

It would be helpful to engage in a meaningful way if you would quit making things up and instead discussed things that were not pulled out of your lower orifice.

I was right then. I thought you were trying to troll me. Whatever's bugging you, I hope you get over it. Bye.

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9 hours ago, mistermack said:

I'm not getting my point across then. What I'm saying is that new cars are designed for new car buyers. Those people on average keep a new car for six years. The components are designed to outlast six years of average mileage. So the new car buyers are not really influenced by the redundancy designed into them. The only way that they are affected is in the devaluation when trading in, or selling their car. People tend to just accept that as a fact of life, as most brands are affected equally. 

So long as the manufacturer produces a car that lasts until the first owner trades it in, they won't damage their reputation. 

New car owners also tend to use the manufacturer's main dealers for servicing as well. So designing the requirement for special tools into the car doesn't really affect that market. It's an ongoing process. Year on year, the cars are becoming more specialised so that only main dealers have the ability to service them. 

 

Unfortunately you seem to get into a lot of silly arguments at cross purposes over minor points of order, which is a great pity since you sometimes produce thoughts and comments of real worth and substance such as this post I have given +1 for.
Some of your other posts in this thread also contain useful comments.

I would like to add some additional comments as follows.

The last time I heard an authoritative estimate of the % of company cars on the road it was an AA report on the radio and stood at ' over40%'
Company car buyers, especially fleet operators,  definitely use a different mindset which is much more aligned to your post.

At least in the UK, tax rules considerably distort any free market purchase decisions. One result is that many cars are leased, not purchased by their users.

I believe that longevity of cars has increased during the latter half of the 20th century, but reliability is a different matter and serviceability is another matter again.
In my experience both these last two have not shown any long term trend, rather showing ups and downs over time.
The OP is quite right to ask if the large number of electronic components now incorporated will lead to an up or a down in those trends.

So I would remember that we should be focusing on the OP question concerning these chips.

 

Edited by studiot
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50 minutes ago, studiot said:

I believe that longevity of cars has increased during the latter half of the 20th century, but reliability is a different matter and serviceability is another matter again.
In my experience both these last two have not shown any long term trend, rather showing ups and downs over time.

If you do your own car maintenance, what I'm talking about would ben unavoidable. I bought a Renault Megane coupe cabriolet when I scrapped the Renault Espace. ( yes, I'm a glutton for punishment, but they are all as bad as each other). I needed to replace two bulbs in the headlights. To do that, you have to take the entire front off the car. Removing panels under the wheel arches as well and dropping the front bumper assembly down, just to get access to change two light bulbs. Most people would not attempt it. 

Look it up online if you don't believe me. Halfords will change light bulbs on most cars. On that car, they have a written instruction to staff "do not attempt". 

The fact that any manufacturer would design such  an outrageous thing shows that there is a deliberate process. They get away with it because all of the manufacturers do similar things. 

Cars could easily be made today that were reliable and easy to service. The technology has moved on enormously in the last fifty years. But the manufacturers get a big income stream from servicing, and if cars lasted too long and were cheap and easy to maintain, sales of new cars would suffer, so they HAVE to ensure that they are uneconomic to maintain, past a certain age. 

If you have a car that is worth £1,000 and you are quoted £1200 to change the cam belt, what do you do? That's the reality, and that's why you see such clean undamaged cars in the breakers yards these days.

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