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Synchrotron Wavelength


Enthalpy
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Hi everyone and everybody,

Following the generalized and repeated question about synchrotron radiation wavelength there
scienceforums

When the deflection is big, at a star, at some bending magnets... the beam divergence combined with the angular speed defines the pulse duration, with a known formula.

But a horizontally ultrarelativistic particle that falls in a lab experiences an extremely small deflection, so the beam divergence obviously doesn't limit the pulse duration.

Instead, the distance over which the particle may emit the observable part of the pulse limits the pulse duration. It should have been clear enough after I related many times the duration with the flight distance:
06 Mar 2016 - 19 Jun 2021 - 22 Aug 2021
It's also the very same and well known computation as in a free electron laser.

Example: a photon takes 100ns to fly over 30m, a 7TeV proton is 9.0ppb slower so it takes 0.90fs more than the photon, and for an observer close to the proton flight path, the end of the pulse (emitted last) is 0.90fs after start (emitted first), giving a mean period around 1.80fs and mean wavelength around 540nm.

I didn't answer, not because the question is tough, but because I claim a physicist should be able to compute a difference, and I felt there were enough indications before.

I did answer "what particle" and more questions despite the information was in the first message
10 Jul 2021
but at some point, my patience stretches out.

More so when one seems to ask lots of random questions just to swell a thread, derail it, or make it unintelligible, but doesn't invest the minimum time to read it before. Extravagant claims like "strong force and electrostatic repulsion don't contribute to the atomic mass" would take too long to debug in a thread not centred on general understanding of Relativity. Their mix with more advanced jargon produces a deplorable impression - I won't qualify that. And the resurgence by the same person of general understanding questions, or wrong claims, that I had already addressed in other threads, convince me that I would waste my time answering them every time.

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59 minutes ago, Enthalpy said:

a photon takes 100ns to fly over 30m, a 7TeV proton is 9.0ppb slower so it takes 0.90fs more than the photon, and for an observer close to the proton flight path, the end of the pulse (emitted last) is 0.90fs after start (emitted first), giving a mean period around 1.80fs

How is this 0.9fs a “pulse”? You have a proton traveling 30m, which is an arbitrary distance. What’s the connection to the radiation emitted?

Is this radiation observed in linear accelerators? Please provide evidence.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Enthalpy said:

I took two lines to explain one subtraction. The feedback was "what's the connection?" I call that trolling.

You didn’t explain why your numbers are physically relevant.

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6 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

Don't feed the troll.

!

Moderator Note

I think you've been given far too much leeway in the past. Your threads don't get many replies, and it seems you've grown a very thin skin when your concepts are challenged. You need to abide by the rules here, or you need to stop posting, it's that simple. We'd hate to lose you, but you can't sweep mistakes or concerns under the rug anymore. From now on, you need to address concerns and reply in a way that facilitates meaningful discussion, and the staff will be the arbiters of what is meaningful in every case.

 
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