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Principle of matter


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Gravity

Is simple, no need for fancy equations

F=mg

Is pretty much enough

Matter pulls matter

A most basic law in our universe

In particle dimension electromagnetic forces are at hand of course. The force of gravity is yet too weak at this level. From a certain mass gravity kicks in.

Is this certain mass known to you ?

Edited by EldadEshel
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When you have two opposing forces clearly the stronger one will 'win', regardless of how the forces are generated.

The Magdeburg Hemispheres is a famous experiment to demonstrate this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdeburg_hemispheres

 

Clearly the atmouspheric pressure force will win until Guerike harnesses enough horses.

Then the horses will win.

 

Similarly a given gravitational force can be stronger than, weaker than or even equal to a given electromagnetic force.

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4 hours ago, EldadEshel said:

In particle dimension electromagnetic forces are at hand of course. The force of gravity is yet too weak at this level. From a certain mass gravity kicks in.

Is this certain mass known to you ?

There is no threshold.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's not a matter of gravity suddenly "kicking in". A tiny  mass produces a tiny gravitational force. Two very tiny masses will move toward each very slowly but with slowly increasing speed.  Two larger masses will move toward each other with greater acceleration.  It's simply a matter of when you are able to notice the acceleration.  That depends on you not the mass.

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1 hour ago, Country Boy said:

It's not a matter of gravity suddenly "kicking in". A tiny  mass produces a tiny gravitational force. Two very tiny masses will move toward each very slowly but with slowly increasing speed.  Two larger masses will move toward each other with greater acceleration.  It's simply a matter of when you are able to notice the acceleration.  That depends on you not the mass.

At some point it's a matter of QM and the uncertainty principle, because we would not be able to simultaneously measure the change in position and change in speed.

But I agree gravity doesn't "kick in" at some threshold, according to what we know about gravity.

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