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dimreepr
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I struggle to get a thought written into a sentence, before I divert myself with endless tangent's.

Is this a recognised disorder?

Is there a technique I can employ?

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54 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

Is this a recognised disorder?

It is typical for chatbots.. ;)

56 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

Is there a technique I can employ?

Scan more data..

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Several disorders are associated with what's clinically called "racing thoughts, " those such as anxiety,  bipolar disorder,  ADHD,  and OCD.   It's important to understand that these conditions are identified and addressed through FTF contact with a MH professional,  and not through chatting on the web.   Though I have some experience in the field,  it was mainly in making referrals.   

If you consult with a pro,  and it's determined not to rise to the level of a disorder, e. g.  it's just scattered thoughts like most of us have FTtT,  then I'm sure many of us can suggest meditative techniques to help focus.  

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45 minutes ago, iNow said:

Reduce weed ingestion whilst posting or just in general

Weed and whisky are often (ab)used by people with bipolar disorder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder

"The onset of a manic or depressive episode is often foreshadowed by sleep disturbance.[31] Mood changes, psychomotor and appetite changes, and an increase in anxiety can also occur up to three weeks before a manic episode develops. Manic individuals often have a history of substance abuse developed over years as a form of "self-medication".[32]"

Alcohol and weed are known depressants.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depressant

"A depressant, or central depressant, is a drug that lowers neurotransmission levels, which is to depress or reduce arousal or stimulation, in various areas of the brain.[1] Depressants are also occasionally referred to as "downers" as they lower the level of arousal when taken. Stimulants or "uppers" increase mental and/or physical function, hence the opposite drug class of depressants is stimulants, not antidepressants."

i.e. a person with bipolar disorder (or other mental illness) wants to decrease nervous activity of the brain.. An unaware stranger observing such a person just sees his or her the drug abuse, not understanding what is happening in the brain (which requires e.g. MRI)

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3 hours ago, iNow said:

Reduce weed ingestion whilst posting or just in general

Yes, chronic use can play hell with micro-memory, can lead to frequent distractions of thought and feeling ambivalent about things, causing indecision. 

Edited by StringJunky
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22 hours ago, dimreepr said:

I struggle to get a thought written into a sentence, before I divert myself with endless tangent's.

Is this a recognised disorder?

Is there a technique I can employ?

Unfortunately, I will be no help cause I suffer with the same problem. It becomes problematic at work when I have so much going on, it then deters me from finishing each thing in any sort of order. 

I was advised once to try meditation or similar, but I found this very difficult. The premise being that "empty your mind", - yes... well that's the problem mate, I can't! 

I also suffer with racing thoughts, in that my mind often zips around like an old projector going from still to still at high speed. Only each still is not associated with its predecessor. This keeps me awake at night quite a lot. I do now refrain from going on my computer, reading books or watching documentaries in the evenings and stick to comedy or fictionally entertaining tv that doesn't require my brain to engage in. This does seem to help with my sleep.  

The only thing I would suggest, which I try to do is write your thought down straight away and keep it as brief as possible. 

20 hours ago, TheVat said:

Several disorders are associated with what's clinically called "racing thoughts, " those such as anxiety,  bipolar disorder,  ADHD,  and OCD.   It's important to understand that these conditions are identified and addressed through FTF contact with a MH professional,  and not through chatting on the web.   Though I have some experience in the field,  it was mainly in making referrals.   

If you consult with a pro,  and it's determined not to rise to the level of a disorder, e. g.  it's just scattered thoughts like most of us have FTtT,  then I'm sure many of us can suggest meditative techniques to help focus.  

I suffer with anxiety and never really associated it with racing thoughts.

Nice post!

@ dimreeper

Maybe you have some other issues or even trauma that sparked off your current condition?

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6 minutes ago, Intoscience said:

I was advised once to try meditation or similar, but I found this very difficult. The premise being that "empty your mind", - yes... well that's the problem mate, I can't! 

I often hear this of experience and it leads me to believe people are being taught wrong - or maybe it's just a different meditation technique to what i'm familiar with. The mind thinks as the heart beats - trying to get either to stop is a bad idea. I've always been taught observation is the goal, not cessation.  Perhaps try a different meditation teacher.

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My experience of meditation is very much like @Prometheus'. Don't try to fight your thoughts; it's futile. Don't let your thoughts run the show, that's all.

Breathe low and become aware of your breath. Observe your thoughts. You can't control what you think, but you can take a sit and watch your thinking. Then, at some point, your thoughts become like fluff that's passing by in front of you. You get used to this feeling of watching your thinking like watching clouds going across the sky, one after another.

Let go of any thought that stays there for two long (more than a couple of seconds). If it doesn't disappear, question it: Why this thought? Where did it come from? Where will it go after an hour? Questioning is very powerful. Generally.

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16 hours ago, iNow said:

Reduce weed ingestion whilst posting or just in general

I hardly smoke anything these day's, can't afford it, just when I find a bag or when a mate shares, much like JD.

Besides, this is a life long problem; I have no problem with learning or exam's, just don't ask me to write an essay.

21 hours ago, TheVat said:

Several disorders are associated with what's clinically called "racing thoughts, " those such as anxiety,  bipolar disorder,  ADHD,  and OCD.   It's important to understand that these conditions are identified and addressed through FTF contact with a MH professional,  and not through chatting on the web. 

I appreciate your post, but I'm just asking, not trying to find a diagnosis. 

I'm generally so laid back, it's difficult to find a pulse. 🙂

50 minutes ago, Prometheus said:

I often hear this of experience and it leads me to believe people are being taught wrong - or maybe it's just a different meditation technique to what i'm familiar with. The mind thinks as the heart beats - trying to get either to stop is a bad idea. I've always been taught observation is the goal, not cessation.  Perhaps try a different meditation teacher.

I often do my best thinking while meditating - often down to the core of a problem; then I try to write it down and the leaking starts, as I seek for the correct wording.

1 hour ago, Intoscience said:

Maybe you have some other issues or even trauma that sparked off your current condition?

To be honest, my life hasn't been free of trauma but I'm content with who I am now.

It's just a little frustrating that I can't fully share that understanding. 

Thanks everyone for the input, it's appreciated... 

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2 hours ago, joigus said:

My experience of meditation is very much like @Prometheus'. Don't try to fight your thoughts; it's futile. Don't let your thoughts run the show, that's all.

Breathe low and become aware of your breath. Observe your thoughts. You can't control what you think, but you can take a sit and watch your thinking. Then, at some point, your thoughts become like fluff that's passing by in front of you. You get used to this feeling of watching your thinking like watching clouds going across the sky, one after another.

Let go of any thought that stays there for two long (more than a couple of seconds). If it doesn't disappear, question it: Why this thought? Where did it come from? Where will it go after an hour? Questioning is very powerful. Generally.

This is how I've experienced meditation, too.   Thoughts,  feelings,  rise up like bubbles from deeper in the mind.   You become more observant of where they're rising from.   Good point about not fighting thoughts.   For some,  that takes a kind of courage,  especially if they've developed a sense of identity that depends on "mastering" thoughts judged to be bad.   

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On 8/11/2021 at 7:44 AM, dimreepr said:

I struggle to get a thought written into a sentence, before I divert myself with endless tangent's.

I'll look at the other responses and maybe learn something or add something, after I toss in my spontaneous one.

That seems to me typical of an inquisitive mind and active imagination. Thoughts are hard to discipline; even after you find the right method that works for you, it takes years of practice to apply consistently. It's also possible that your mode of ideation is not primarily verbal, so you have to keep translating into grammatical format, and when your mind gets bored with that, it  just kind of slides off the words; they become difficult to grasp and put into place. (That's a bit fanciful, but if it applies, you'll recognize it.) 

On 8/11/2021 at 7:44 AM, dimreepr said:

Is this a recognised disorder?

In its extreme form, I suppose ADHD comes closest. But I don't think you have the other symptoms.

 

On 8/11/2021 at 7:44 AM, dimreepr said:

Is there a technique I can employ?

Almost certainly. But I can't say which would work for you - I'd have to know you very much better even to recommend one.

I sometimes find it useful to make lists and notes, before a fleeting notion gets away, or i forget a figure. My desk is littered with pages from a notebook with gibberish scribbled all over them: url's, words i dislike, blog ideas, names, poem fragments, slogans, passwords, calculations. They're useless after a week or so, but in the moment, I find them helpful to draw a series of thoughts into some coherence.

BTW, are you synesthetic?

 

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All those thoughts are a blessing. Not racing thoughts but the potential ideas. If you are control of those thoughts you can focus them. Too many ideas is better than no ideas. That is one heck of a brainstorming session. You should not write in proper pose. Instead write down ideas and create outlines.

I listened to an Audible book on how to create things by writing. It can help you write a book but it helps in all areas of creativity. The book is called Accidental Genius by Mark Levy.

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19 hours ago, Peterkin said:

BTW, are you synesthetic?

No, although tactile-emotion synesthesia does resonate with me.

12 hours ago, Trurl said:

All those thoughts are a blessing. Not racing thoughts but the potential ideas. If you are control of those thoughts you can focus them. Too many ideas is better than no ideas. That is one heck of a brainstorming session. You should not write in proper pose. Instead write down ideas and create outlines.

I listened to an Audible book on how to create things by writing. It can help you write a book but it helps in all areas of creativity. The book is called Accidental Genius by Mark Levy.

Thanks, I'll give it a try and look into that book.

20 hours ago, Peterkin said:

That seems to me typical of an inquisitive mind and active imagination. Thoughts are hard to discipline; even after you find the right method that works for you, it takes years of practice to apply consistently. It's also possible that your mode of ideation is not primarily verbal, so you have to keep translating into grammatical format, and when your mind gets bored with that, it  just kind of slides off the words; they become difficult to grasp and put into place. (That's a bit fanciful, but if it applies, you'll recognize it.) 

I think it's more likely that I'm just a bit thick or just a bit lazy.

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5 hours ago, dimreepr said:

I think it's more likely that I'm just a bit thick or just a bit lazy.

I'll accept lazy - particularly in linguistic effort. It's easier to be sloppy; nothing depends on your correct grammar.  You might be surprised how lazy some authors are and how much of the slack editors have to take up. (gripe, gripe, gripe... I can't leave a badly-phrased sentence lying around in plain sight, which is why I keep coming back to edit.)

Edited by Peterkin
badly phrased sentence
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On 8/11/2021 at 4:00 PM, TheVat said:

Several disorders are associated with what's clinically called "racing thoughts, " those such as anxiety,  bipolar disorder,  ADHD,  and OCD.   It's important to understand that these conditions are identified and addressed through FTF contact with a MH professional,  and not through chatting on the web.   Though I have some experience in the field,  it was mainly in making referrals.   

If you consult with a pro,  and it's determined not to rise to the level of a disorder, e. g.  it's just scattered thoughts like most of us have FTtT,  then I'm sure many of us can suggest meditative techniques to help focus.  

Nice I have probably all of these and 20+ more disorders 😂 And I use them for creativity!

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Hilarious.   

It's unlikely that people actually struggling with mental illness find their conditions useful.   But that notion is sometimes used in a novel, or movie,   and has been a fashionable literary conceit for many years.   

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  • 4 weeks later...

I too have had such writing problems. You are writing for a message board now and it is informal. For essays you have to outline your ideas. Write a draft. You think faster than you write that is why you outline with brief descriptions.

Easy to understand points are a must. If you jump between topics which make sense to you and not the reader you will never get a point across. Simplify.

It is like I know how it works but how do I explain it. You are just trying to form ideas and put them into grammatically correct sentences at the same time. Slow you pace and write ideas on scratch paper.

I was taking a master’s class in adult education. They told me I was writing musings for the internet. I thought the ideas behind the writing was the most important. But presentation of the idea is a tricky art. Knowing science is one thing but teaching it is it’s own art. Same with writing. Clarity and explaining your point is more important than trying to explain everything at once.

Too many ideas to ideas is usually good. You just have to record them before you lose them. Document with a journal.

 

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