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Hypothesis: Gravity Evidence of Big Bang


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(Just to clarify, I am not suggesting I know what causes gravity, nor do I have any evidence for my claim, as I just came up with it.)

When you grab a ball, and let go of it, gravity pulls it down due to the energy you gave to the ball, right? Using this logic since everything in the universe is effected by gravity, there must have been something that pulled everything away from everything. Since the Big Bang theorises everything comes from a point, and was pushed away from that point, that would suggest the pushing of the Big Bang provided the energy for gravity.

I don’t know if this has already been theorised, or how this plays with dark energy, but I’m coming up with this as I’m writing this.

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1 hour ago, Display name2 said:

Using this logic since everything in the universe is effected by gravity, there must have been something that pulled everything away from everything.

Here is the information for reflection, the energy density has the dimension of pressure.

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Einstein's equations are compatible with a menu of possibilities, with positive, negative or null cosmological constants. They're also compatible with different choices of initial conditions, so it's not that simple.

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7 hours ago, Display name2 said:

When you grab a ball, and let go of it, gravity pulls it down due to the energy you gave to the ball, right?

No. When you let go of a ball, you haven’t given it energy. If you throw a ball you impart energy to it, but gravity affects the ball whether or not you gave it energy.

 

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Although from the big bang you cannot infer gravity (meaning Einstein's field equations), there is a connection between both in the opposite logical direction. Singularities are a consequence of Einstein's field equations. This is the content of the Penrose-Hawking singularity theorem. Under a set of assumptions that amount to saying that causality holds (until you reach a horizon, that is), horizons themselves, and the singularities hidden behind them, are a must. Another way of saying it is that congruences of geodesics are not complete.

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Geodesic incompleteness is the notion that there are geodesics, paths of observers through spacetime, that can only be extended for a finite time as measured by an observer traveling along one. 

So you could say singularities are a consequence of classical gravity (GR). We do not believe classical general relativity is the whole story though. You need quantum mechanics to really understand gravitational horizons. Quantum mechanics must be heavily involved there.

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