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Particle Gravitational Oscillator & Wave Function


Kartazion
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Here I will develop how to plot a wave function with an oscillator. At first it is easy to understand that the oscillating particle traces this wave function.

1139474614_oscillateurradiatif_incertitude_electron_gif.gif.8e80973b99e6fc82f5fe046664c50d7a.gifimage.gif.195e67876f220c7c5633cfad1b3f6fb8.gifimage.gif.7d7262cafc106fa79bec988521cc01bb.gif

 

We can see that there are two types of wave function to create.

The first is the simple plot of a non-sinusoidal x(t) type curve with the particle.
The second uses an energy ratio plot. We can use the levels of the hyperfine structure to determine the amplitude in relation to the implusion to be given of the particle.
 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Kartazion said:

Here I will develop how to plot a wave function with an oscillator. At first it is easy to understand that the oscillating particle traces this wave function.

1139474614_oscillateurradiatif_incertitude_electron_gif.gif.8e80973b99e6fc82f5fe046664c50d7a.gifimage.gif.195e67876f220c7c5633cfad1b3f6fb8.gifimage.gif.7d7262cafc106fa79bec988521cc01bb.gif

The particle's oscillation is of constant amplitude. The wave function you are showing has an amplitude varying with whatever is on the x axis (position or time), neither of which works with the example.

 

Quote

We can see that there are two types of wave function to create.

The first is the simple plot of a non-sinusoidal x(t) type curve with the particle.
The second uses an energy ratio plot. We can use the levels of the hyperfine structure to determine the amplitude in relation to the implusion to be given of the particle.
 

What hyperfine structure? You just have a mass bouncing vertically in a potential well.

Even if you had an atom here, what does the hyperfine structure have to do with this?

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7 minutes ago, swansont said:

The particle's oscillation is of constant amplitude. The wave function you are showing has an amplitude varying with whatever is on the x axis (position or time), neither of which works with the example.

 

What hyperfine structure? You just have a mass bouncing vertically in a potential well.

Even if you had an atom here, what does the hyperfine structure have to do with this?

Hyperfine structure - Wikipedia

The hyperfine structure gives the height, or the amplitude.

The oscillation of the electron in the atom creates a photon of real shape in terms of waveform.

The oscillation of the electron takes place with the Bohr radius from the center of the atom, to the electronic shells.

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If you insist on spreading this topic over more than one thread, I am pulling out.

Swansont has asked you the same question I already asked in the other thread, but not answered.

 

32 minutes ago, swansont said:

What hyperfine structure? You just have a mass bouncing vertically in a potential well.

Even if you had an atom here, what does the hyperfine structure have to do with this?

 

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52 minutes ago, Kartazion said:

In atomic physics, hyperfine structure is defined by small shifts in otherwise degenerate energy levels and the resulting splittings in those energy levels of atoms, molecules, and ions, due to interaction between the nucleus and electron clouds.

 

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The hyperfine structure gives the height, or the amplitude.

What if your bouncing object is an electron, which is what you use in another thread. An electron has no hyperfine structure.

What if the bouncing object is an atom with nuclear spin of zero? Then it has no hyperfine structure,

Quote

The oscillation of the electron in the atom creates a photon of real shape in terms of waveform.

The oscillation of the electron takes place with the Bohr radius from the center of the atom, to the electronic shells.

!

Moderator Note

Word salad. making stuff up without a testable model violates the rules of the speculations forum.

 

 

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