Jump to content

D antigen & biological immortality


Flamboyant
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

I didn't know where to fit the subject so I put it here. Sorry for my very poor English, I am French speaking.

I'm wondering about the D antigen (ABO system & Rhesus system). I first consulted Wikipedia (not the most reliable, but the fastest), and then other French-speaking scientific communities, which are turning a deaf ear, without really getting an answer...

I didn't understand absolutely nothing, not being a scientist... in fact, I passed tests concerning immortality ; and by "chance" or "without doing it on purpose", scientists found large amounts of D antigen in my body. This allows me to heal from severe wounds, and even death.

Could a good soul shine a light on this famous D antigen in my lantern ? What is it and what is it for ?

Thank you in advance and cordially,

David

This could be related to this jellyfish : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turritopsis_nutricula

Memorial_pamphlet_containing_certain_dra

Nothing about a genetic relation between this "méduse" (in french) with a human body.

Human immortals cannot return to childhood. We would be "stuck" at a completely different stage of maturation than Highlander syndrome. No report. The carbon-14 isotope only allows 50 thousand years of dating.

2 methods :

- Uranium–thorium dating : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uranium–thorium_dating

- K–Ar dating : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K–Ar_dating

Edited by Flamboyant
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Flamboyant changed the title to D antigen & biological immortality
8 hours ago, Flamboyant said:

This allows me to heal from severe wounds, and even death.

You are deluded, you can't 'heal' from death.  You are going to die.  If you are really unlucky you could live to be 120, but that's about it.

Edited by Bufofrog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bufofrog said:

You are deluded, you can't 'heal' from death.  You are going to die.  If you are really unlucky you could live to be 120, but that's about it.

NDE + accelerated regeneration + accelerated healing. I know it can makes some fragile people jaleous, but it's truth. Very hard to cash in. And yes we can heal from death. Any manner.

It is a curse : you have not read a single word from the scientific articles that I have sourced for everyone. It's always easier to dodge the obvious than to answer it, isn't it ?

Après : certaines leçons en français. Et là, je ne lésine pas sur les moyens coercitifs employés.

What about D antigen ? Please follow the thread.

Edited by Flamboyant
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Flamboyant said:

NDE + accelerated regeneration + accelerated healing

NDE ≠ Death. I know it makes some fragile people uncomfortable, but death is not something from which people “heal” … in any manner and by definition. I guess it’s always easier to dodge the obvious than to answer it, isn't it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Flamboyant said:

What about D antigen ?

How is it possible that such a presence is in my body? I thought it was for pregnant women only. I'm a man ; an hematopoietic chimera by dizygotic pregnancy. Maybe it can help ? Maybe there's a link between D antigen, accelerated healing, and no aging - as if my body is self-actualizing.

That's why I talked about the 3 dating methods in my first post.

Edited by Flamboyant
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Flamboyant said:

Human immortals cannot return to childhood.

Human immortals can't do anything since they don't exist.  If you are writing this to just troll, I have to say this trolling is a bit too silly.  If you actually believe this then I think you should see a doctor at get some help.

Good luck. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Flamboyant said:

It is a curse : you have not read a single word from the scientific articles that I have sourced for everyone. It's always easier to dodge the obvious than to answer it, isn't it ?

Your links detail dating processes, but you haven't established that your claims of immortality are related to them, so nobody is dodging anything except you. You need to take this step by step and stop leaping to conclusions. 

Are you asking questions, or are you trying to tell us about an explanation you've made up? Think carefully, and since you've reached your first day 5 post limit (to avoid spammers), we can take this up again tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Flamboyant said:

I cannot reply under 24h.

But you joined 25 hours ago, so now you can post as much as you want. Evidence in support of this hypothesis: this is your 6th post.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, Phi for All said:

Are you asking questions, or are you trying to tell us about an explanation you've made up?

Rhetoric question = useless.

A good question were : how about "longueur télomères" & "double DNA".

Good luck. Even excellent scientists cannot respond.

PS : photophobia =symptomatic.

More infos :

(I don't khow how to say it in english)

- Photophobia Allergy to sunlight 3rd degree
- Burns with SLE
- Vital need for blood transfusions - regardless of group.

Where comes from D antigen.

Edited by Flamboyant
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Flamboyant said:

Rhetoric question = useless.

A good question were : how about "longueur télomères" & "double DNA".

Good luck. Even excellent scientists cannot respond.

Possibly because you are difficult to understand. Your response to my question failed to help me gain clarity. 

Of the two that I've asked, which question of mine do you feel was "rhetoric question"?

"How about longueur télomères & double DNA?" is actually not a very good question, since it's so vague and general. It's certainly a bad answer to either of the questions I've asked.

"Even excellent scientists cannot respond" seems overly generalized and meaningless. Have you spoken to all of them? Could some of them have had trouble understanding your English? No offense, please, but keeping an open mind is very important when discussing science. Be careful of the conclusions you jump to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not the only one.

We are 6.

Our greatest fear is to be locked up like animals in cells ignored by the World. And endure excruciating tests all the time, without limits.

Nous devons fuir.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Phi for All said:

I know the feeling. You've ignored my questions completely.

Sorry bro. Vague question.

Please repeat it, please ; thread location has been changed.

Il will be a pleasure to answer to you.

Dav'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Flamboyant said:

Our greatest fear is to be locked up like animals in cells ignored by the World. And endure excruciating tests all the time, without limits.

Well then proclaiming that you exist to the world seems sort of stupid, don't you think?  I think the best thing for you to do to protect yourself is to stop posting on this forum.

PS, are all 6 of you guys in the same ward?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_immortality
 

Biological immortality (sometimes referred to as bio-indefinite mortality) is a state in which the rate of mortality from senescence is stable or decreasing, thus decoupling it from chronological age. Various unicellular and multicellular species, including some vertebrates, achieve this state either throughout their existence or after living long enough. A biologically immortal living being can still die from means other than senescence, such as through injury, poison, disease, lack of available resources, or changes to environment.

This definition of immortality has been challenged in the Handbook of the Biology of Aging, because the increase in rate of mortality as a function of chronological age may be negligible at extremely old ages, an idea referred to as the late-life mortality plateau. The rate of mortality may cease to increase in old age, but in most cases that rate is typically very high.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

What biological immortality is made of ?

- Anti-aging
- Accelerated regeneration
- Invulnerability to weapons
- Etc.

I wonder if a headshot could stop an immortal.

Edited by Flamboyant
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.20minutes.fr/arts-stars/culture/2700947-20200122-immortalite-biologique-repousser-limites-mort-parait-impossible-estime-helene-merle-beral

Pourquoi l’homme devrait-il supporter de vieillir ? Hélène Merle-Béral, médecin, spécialiste des leucémies, étudie cette terrible injustice dont font l’objet la plupart des espèces vivantes dans L’immortalité biologique, publié ce mercredi chez Odile Jacob. Le transhumanisme n’a pas peur d’envisager l’immortalité comme une réalité future. Certains, comme l’entrepreneur Laurent Alexandre, pensent que l’homme qui vivra 1.000 ans est déjà né. Qu’en dit la science ? Hélène Merle-Béral aide 20 Minutes à faire le tour de la question.

Comment la mort se différencie-t-elle de la vieillesse ?

La mort dépend des cultures. Les organes ne s’arrêtent pas tous d’un coup. Il y a un état de coma, de pré-mort. Ce qui est considéré comme la mort officielle par l’OMS, c’est la mort cérébrale, l’électro encéphalogramme plat. Il n’y a plus de liaison entre les neurones, il n’y a plus d’influx nerveux. Mais il y a plusieurs types de mort. La mort officielle, c’est la mort clinique. En dehors de ça, certains organes peuvent continuer à fonctionner quelque temps. Quelques fois, le cœur continue à battre alors que le cerveau est éteint. Trois organes – le cerveau, les poumons et le cœur – ont besoin les uns des autres. S’il y en a un qui ne marche plus, les autres meurent.

Du coup, la vieillesse est une pré-mort ?

La mort peut survenir par des accidents, des phénomènes extérieurs, des maladies, des virus, le suicide, un assassinat… Le chapitre sur le vieillissement, je le trouve infernal parce qu’il montre bien que tous les organes vieillissent plus ou moins, à une plus ou moins grande rapidité. Ça dépend aussi de facteurs génétiques, de facteurs sociaux, économiques… Inéluctablement tous les organes vieillissent, s’usent. Il y a une entropie, les cellules ont de plus en plus de mal à communiquer entre elles. C’est la communication avec le milieu extérieur et les autres cellules qui maintient en vie.

Dans les gènes, il y a une programmation : ce qu’on appelle la mort cellulaire programmée. Les cellules sont destinées à mourir, il y a une limite de division cellulaire. On a montré qu’au bout d’un certain nombre de cycles de division cellulaire, qui dépend des organismes, la cellule doit mourir. Pour l’homme, c’est autour de 52.

Vous parlez d’immortalité biologique dans votre livre, pouvez-vous expliquer ce que c’est ?

L’immortalité biologique existe, on peut l’observer dans la nature. C’est la capacité pour un organisme de rajeunir et de vieillir éternellement. Il devient un être immortel biologiquement mais il reste sensible aux agressions extérieures. Dans la nature, il n’y a qu’un exemple, c’est la méduse Turritopsis nutricula. C’est l’exemple d’immortalité biologique absolu parce qu’elle peut vivre sous deux formes : la forme polype et la forme méduse. Elle a cette propriété extraordinaire de refuser de mourir. Quand elle est dans les conditions de stress, des conditions dangereuses, elle repasse à l’état de polype, elle inverse le processus de vieillissement. Quand les conditions extérieures sont meilleures, elle peut redevenir méduse. Elle est potentiellement immortelle.

Certains transhumanistes pensent que l’homme qui vivra 1000 ans est déjà né. Qu’en pense la médecine ?

La médecine, bien sûr, n’est pas d’accord. On commence à décrypter beaucoup de mécanismes, mais on ne sait pas comment tout s’enchaîne. Les facteurs génétiques, les radicaux libres, les oxydants, ce qui détruit nos molécules ADN… On arrive à décrypter beaucoup de facteurs. Les télomères, par exemple, à l’extrémité des chromosomes, permettent à la cellule de se renouveler. La nature a fabriqué une enzyme, la télomérase, qui permet aux chromosomes de régénérer leurs extrémités. Au bout d’un certain temps, ces réserves de télomérase s’épuisent et la cellule ne peut plus se diviser. Elle est condamnée à mourir. C’est une des raisons pour lesquelles on meurt. On a déjà identifié ces mécanismes dans la biologie humaine, c’est un progrès. On a essayé de donner des télomérases en complément alimentaire, mais c’est beaucoup moins efficace que ce qu’on pensait. On a cru que la télomérase allait être l’élixir de jouvence et on a réalisé qu’elle est en abondance dans les cellules cancéreuses. Elles ont beaucoup de télomérase et donc elles se multiplient. On tâtonne mais on avance quand même. Ça me paraît vertigineux de repousser les limites de la mort, mais ça ne me paraît pas impossible.

A quel âge pourra-t-on espérer mourir ?

Aujourd’hui, on admet que la nature humaine ne peut pas dépasser 115 ans. Jeanne Calment détient le record mondial à 122 ans, mais il n’y a pas d’autres exemples. Aujourd’hui, on dénombre pas mal de centenaires dans le monde. Je pense qu’on pourrait banaliser ce phénomène avec tous les progrès. La médecine préventive se développe rapidement. Avec la prévention, les traitements génétiques, le génie génétique [l’ensemble des outils permettant de modifier la constitution génétique d’un organisme en supprimant, en introduisant ou en remplaçant de l’ADN] qui pourrait limiter certaines maladies héréditaires, des médicaments particuliers qui pourraient freiner les mécanismes de mort cellulaire programmée, je pense que ce n’est pas impossible. Quand j’ai commencé en tant qu’hématologiste, il y a une trentaine d’années, certaines maladies du sang étaient inéluctablement mortelles. Maintenant on les guérit. Pourquoi ne pourrait-on pas réaliser des choses dans vingt ans qui nous paraissent impossibles aujourd’hui ? Il faut rester modeste. Mais l’immortalité, honnêtement, non.

Raymond Kurzweil a annoncé la singularité numérique pour 2045. Quel est votre avis sur les grandes annonces de la Silicon Valley ?

Je suis un peu sceptique, en particulier sur les annonces de Raymond Kurzweil. C’est un scientifique de haut niveau, un précurseur, il connaît parfaitement son sujet. C’est quelqu’un de fiable intellectuellement. Tout à coup, c’est comme s’il partait en plein délire. La singularité technologique, c’est le moment où toutes les NBIC (nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, informatique et sciences cognitives) convergent, où l’intelligence artificielle dépasse l’intelligence de l’homme. Dans cette hypothèse, si le cerveau de l’homme n’est pas interfacé avec une machine, il sera complètement dépassé, et donc les robots domineront le monde. On dirait de la science-fiction. Le seul problème, c’est que cela inquiète des gens extrêmement sérieux, des scientifiques non discutables comme Stephen Hawking, [qui est mort depuis], Bill Gates ou Elon Musk. Ils ont signé une lettre pour mettre en garde l’opinion mondiale contre les dangers possibles de l’intelligence artificielle.

Avez-vous été surprise par une avancée technique sur les dernières années ?

Concernant le vieillissement, pas grand-chose. Le plus répandu, aujourd’hui, ce sont les crèmes – ça n’a jamais vraiment marché – et la chirurgie. Ce qui m’a le plus frappée, c’est que des maladies qui étaient considérées comme mortelles à court terme, se guérissent aujourd’hui. Cela montre des perspectives infinies sur l’évolution possible. Une personne qui avait un type de leucémie particulier, qui était condamnée, vingt ans plus tard, on la guérit avec un comprimé à prendre pendant trois mois. C’est fabuleux. Je pense que beaucoup de choses sont possibles. Il faut rester modeste et en même temps confiant dans l’intelligence humaine.

Si vous faites appel à votre imagination, qu’est-ce qui vous semble le plus proche d’arriver ?

Interfacer le cerveau avec de l’intelligence artificielle et avoir un cerveau numérisé, virtuel, c’est un cauchemar mais pas une réalité tangible. Ce qui me paraît le plus réalisable, ce sont les progrès médicaux. Pas une immortalité mais le recul de la mort, atténuer les désagréments et le délabrement de la vieillesse. D’ailleurs, c’était ça, à l’origine, le transhumanisme. C’était des objectifs médicaux, soigner, éviter les maladies, éviter le cancer.

___

Always trolli,g ? A PhD trolling writing a book ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.