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Filtering soluble carbonates


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I'm looking for ways to filter (besides distillation) soluble alkaline carbonates, such as sodium and potassium carbonates from water. Do things like activated charcoal remove it?

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3 hours ago, gatewood said:

I'm looking for ways to filter (besides distillation) soluble alkaline carbonates, such as sodium and potassium carbonates from water.

1. reverse osmosis

2. You can try to cool the solution so that 3/4 of it turns into ice, drain the unfrozen part of the solution, and then melt the resulting ice.

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Posted (edited)

 

35 minutes ago, chenbeier said:

But this is not filtering, its other kind of removing.

OP should ask for methods of separation of chemical compounds. "filtering" is not surprising term for typical layman.

3 hours ago, gatewood said:

I'm looking for ways to filter (besides distillation) soluble alkaline carbonates, such as sodium and potassium carbonates from water. Do things like activated charcoal remove it?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separation_process

1) read Wikipedia articles of compounds in solution.

2) write down their properties.

3) pick up the one which is the most suitable, utilitizing differences in properties. 

Edited by Sensei
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Posted (edited)

 

2 hours ago, Sensei said:

 

OP should ask for methods of separation of chemical compounds. "filtering" is not surprising term for typical layman.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separation_process

1) read Wikipedia articles of compounds in solution.

2) write down their properties.

3) pick up the one which is the most suitable, utilitizing differences in properties. 

I know about separation techniques, only distillation and precipitation techniques I've found suitable, that's why I ask if anyone here has had experience with what I'm asking. Thanks for the "help".

Edited by gatewood
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6 hours ago, gatewood said:

I know about separation techniques, only distillation and precipitation techniques I've found suitable, that's why I ask if anyone here has had experience with what I'm asking.

If somebody would like to remove water from solution he/she can:

- freeze it (ice forms on the top so you should remove it when it forms.. also solubility of salt depends on temperature therefore I told you to gather and learn properties of compounds that you have in solution and analysis of data),

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_freezing

"Freeze distillation is a misnomer, because it is not distillation but rather a process of enriching a solution by partially freezing it and removing frozen material that is poorer in the dissolved material than is the liquid portion left behind."

 

- vacuum distillation.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_distillation

"Vacuum distillation is often used in large industrial plants as an efficient way to remove salt from ocean water, in order to produce fresh water. This is known as desalination."

(you just have different salt than seasalt)

Having vacuum pump in the home lab is essential thing (apart glassware and stirrer with temperature control).

 

- evaporate excess of water.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporation

 

Quote

Thanks for the "help".

You have to start listening and reading the all materials which are given to you..

If you would ask "how would you efficiently extract alkaline carbonates from solution?" people would give you their ideas. But you asked "how to filter alkaline carbonates from solution?" and upset because people answered "it won't work".. Ask the right questions in the first place..

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11 hours ago, gatewood said:

 

I know about separation techniques, only distillation and precipitation techniques I've found suitable, that's why I ask if anyone here has had experience with what I'm asking. Thanks for the "help".

I have no experience with this myself but my general understanding is that the adsorption capacity of activated carbon goes up with molecular weight of the substance to be adsorbed, and goes down with the degree of solubility of the substance in water. On this basis I would not expect it to be very effective at removing alkali metal cations or carbonate anions. 

But there may be someone else here who knows more about this in practice.

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One of the commonest ways of obtaining potassium carbonate is to leach it from the ashes of a wood fire.
What does that tell you about how well it is absorbed by charcoal?

While you could separate it from water by reverse osmosis, I think it's going to be easier to let the water evaporate.

 

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On 6/9/2021 at 9:42 PM, Sensei said:

If somebody would like to remove water from solution he/she can:

- freeze it (ice forms on the top so you should remove it when it forms.. also solubility of salt depends on temperature therefore I told you to gather and learn properties of compounds that you have in solution and analysis of data),

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_freezing

"Freeze distillation is a misnomer, because it is not distillation but rather a process of enriching a solution by partially freezing it and removing frozen material that is poorer in the dissolved material than is the liquid portion left behind."

 

- vacuum distillation.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_distillation

"Vacuum distillation is often used in large industrial plants as an efficient way to remove salt from ocean water, in order to produce fresh water. This is known as desalination."

(you just have different salt than seasalt)

Having vacuum pump in the home lab is essential thing (apart glassware and stirrer with temperature control).

 

- evaporate excess of water.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporation

 

You have to start listening and reading the all materials which are given to you..

If you would ask "how would you efficiently extract alkaline carbonates from solution?" people would give you their ideas. But you asked "how to filter alkaline carbonates from solution?" and upset because people answered "it won't work".. Ask the right questions in the first place..

The question is the correct one... that's exactly why I asked for "filtering" and not "separation", because it is generally MUCH cheaper to get a simple material to catch and remove the contaminant.

I know it sounds hard without using things like ion exchange or reverse osmosis (e.g. things like arsenic ions can be captured using iron oxide), that's why I thought you might have some clue.

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