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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, gatewood said:

Well no, if added to lye rich soils, it protonates them and it immediately decomposes and neutralizes the basic minerals (if sufficiently alkaline, the reaction will sometimes even be slightly noticeable). I mean, we're basically adding vinegar to the soil, and most of the alkaline metals in the biomass have already been taken up by the microorganisms that fermented it (ashes compose about 1% of the mass of wood).

We generally don't concentrate it, unless we previously produce it and then transport it to the site. I mentioned that we want to leave the locals with self-sufficient techniques and processes, if I'm inquiring for your knowledge, please, it is because I want to see what else is there to potentially try and experiment with, besides "look for it in the store".

Anyhow, the production of carboxylic acids have mostly phased out the use of acetic acid.

Where are the "locals", if I may ask? I have not read about many places with strongly alkaline soil. I suppose parts of the African Rift Valley would be one of them. But in most places where pH needs adjustment, it seems that the issue is the soil becoming too acid. 

 

 

Edited by exchemist
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, exchemist said:

Where are the "locals", if I may ask? I have not read about many places with strongly alkaline soil. I suppose parts of the African Rift Valley would be one of them. But in most places where pH needs adjustment, it seems that the issue is the soil becoming too acid. 

 

 

Latinamerica. It is mostly as a result of poor understanding of agricultural practices. For example, some of the Xochimilco agricultural lands have been overfertilized or abused the use of slash and burn techniques to fertilize and lime their lands (leaving other lands acidic). Another, curious example happens in Brazil, there's been a surge in the use of biochar amending, which is a great practice in itself, but people don't understand that some woods contain a lot of lye (thus, some biochars should be treated with a bit of acid, before they're composted). It worked great for the oxisols of the jungles, but some places have started to become too basic.

Also, some volcanic regions with andisols have great, agricultural potential, though the soil must be acidified too.

Finally, acids are also a great way to treat pathogen/anaerobic ridden lands, it usually helps clear the stage for the return of healthy floras, upon which liming can be applied, to neutralize soils.

Edited by gatewood
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1 hour ago, gatewood said:

Latinamerica. It is mostly as a result of poor understanding of agricultural practices. For example, some of the Xochimilco agricultural lands have been overfertilized or abused the use of slash and burn techniques to fertilize and lime their lands (leaving other lands acidic). Another, curious example happens in Brazil, there's been a surge in the use of biochar amending, which is a great practice in itself, but people don't understand that some woods contain a lot of lye (thus, some biochars should be treated with a bit of acid, before they're composted). It worked great for the oxisols of the jungles, but some places have started to become too basic.

Also, some volcanic regions with andisols have great, agricultural potential, though the soil must be acidified too.

Finally, acids are also a great way to treat pathogen/anaerobic ridden lands, it usually helps clear the stage for the return of healthy floras, upon which liming can be applied, to neutralize soils.

Very interesting. In the case of Brazil, there should be access to gypsum, I'd have thought. 

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