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Molecular transformer in theory


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As the term suggests, molecule is a combination of more than one atoms through bonds. This makes this concept a bit easier to approach, because you are not transforming the elements of an atom like giving an extra neutron or proton into the atom's nucleus which is a whole different complexity. For transforming the molecules, I would say breaking apart the bonds of the atoms an reconfigure it to your needs.

For example I got a tank of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen each. I put these atoms in the precise order and I got myself a hamburger on a plate in an empty space. That is how a molecular transformer should work, where you arrange atoms in precise orders to generate what you need. The idea is a bit similar to 3D printing except you are doing it in an atomic scale.

So my idea is to construct a human body, which is around 7*10^27 atoms. Now the easy part is you build this 3D model inside a computer and you can get a scale and position of what this body should look like built out of atoms. The hardest part is of course assembly, to get each and every atom in the correct position and create bonding with another atom. If you build the body one atom at at a time from the ground up it could take a long time, or you could choose to multi-task by bringing all the atoms together at once. Which means you are moving 7*10^27 atoms at once.

The problem is I have not thought of a way to move atoms around and create bonds, my best guess is using an optogenetic tweerzer to grab an atom and bond it with another atom through the use of laser because a laser could facilitate the bonding of two atoms by giving it a small nudge. But to locate an atom and bring it into its correct position in space is hard because of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

So I want to know if anyone knows the recent breakthrough in science about molecular construction/destruction or optogenetics regarding building molecules through atoms.

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5 hours ago, fredreload said:

The problem is I have not thought of a way to move atoms around and create bonds

Yeah that's always the problem.

I've got an idea where we can build a starship that can move at 90% the speed of light to travel to other stars, the problem is I have not thought of a way to produce the energy and convert it to thrust...

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13 hours ago, Bufofrog said:

Yeah that's always the problem.

I've got an idea where we can build a starship that can move at 90% the speed of light to travel to other stars, the problem is I have not thought of a way to produce the energy and convert it to thrust...

From what I can there are perhaps 3 ways.

1. Using optogenetic laser to grab the molecule into the correct position and solder the bonds with laser.

2. Using nanomachine to assemble the molecules.

3. Using enough energy next to the atom to create a length contract to teleport the atom into the correct position thereby assembling it with the other atoms.

P.S. For your starship I suggest a constant velocity boost in vacuum, an example would be the starship in asteroid where it just keeps accelerating until it hits something. But the vertical force might be too great that it pulls the ship apart.

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1 hour ago, fredreload said:

From what I can there are perhaps 3 ways.

1. Using optogenetic laser to grab the molecule into the correct position and solder the bonds with laser.

2. Using nanomachine to assemble the molecules.

3. Using enough energy next to the atom to create a length contract to teleport the atom into the correct position thereby assembling it with the other atoms.

P.S. For your starship I suggest a constant velocity boost in vacuum, an example would be the starship in asteroid where it just keeps accelerating until it hits something. But the vertical force might be too great that it pulls the ship apart.

All these ideas are useless.  If it impossible for idea to be physically accomplished, then it is little more than fantasy.

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On 3/30/2021 at 5:25 PM, fredreload said:

From what I can there are perhaps 3 ways.

1. Using optogenetic laser to grab the molecule into the correct position and solder the bonds with laser.

2. Using nanomachine to assemble the molecules.

3. Using enough energy next to the atom to create a length contract to teleport the atom into the correct position thereby assembling it with the other atoms.

P.S. For your starship I suggest a constant velocity boost in vacuum, an example would be the starship in asteroid where it just keeps accelerating until it hits something. But the vertical force might be too great that it pulls the ship apart.

By the means you mention here , only molecular biology can work ; NOT organ or whole-body biology . . .. . .

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19 hours ago, Prof Reza Sanaye said:

By the means you mention here , only molecular biology can work ; NOT organ or whole-body biology . . .. . .

Well, perhaps you have heard of the term 3D printed kidney from biological cells. It is the same concept except your are 3D printing biological cells from atoms.

P.S. Well if humanity manage to print the first cell, it won't take long

This article is a heads up that is works, but nothing about the working mechanism https://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2018/05/16/molecular-3d-printer-3d-printing-is-going-further/

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4 hours ago, fredreload said:

It is the same concept except your are 3D printing biological cells from atoms.

That's absurd.  3d printing is done by fusing little bits of metal or plastic.  What you're describing is science fiction.

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It's behind a paywall, but here's a paper in Science about that. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6227/1190

It seems it's just very efficient at performing lots and lots of different organic reactions and isolating the correct byproducts. But, it only talks about making single molecules. Making a large scale biological system is much taller order.

This might interest you, as it's about using nanorobot AI to facilitate supramolecular assembly via atomic orientations, which has obvious implications towards your hypothesis. https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/36/eabb6987 

It's an interesting idea, but it's very theoretical and therefore very much in the realm of science fiction at the moment.

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19 hours ago, Bufofrog said:

That's absurd.  3d printing is done by fusing little bits of metal or plastic.  What you're describing is science fiction.

Ya I sounded a bit harsh, sorry Bufofrog.

18 hours ago, Ericchiriboga said:

It's behind a paywall, but here's a paper in Science about that. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6227/1190

It seems it's just very efficient at performing lots and lots of different organic reactions and isolating the correct byproducts. But, it only talks about making single molecules. Making a large scale biological system is much taller order.

This might interest you, as it's about using nanorobot AI to facilitate supramolecular assembly via atomic orientations, which has obvious implications towards your hypothesis. https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/36/eabb6987 

It's an interesting idea, but it's very theoretical and therefore very much in the realm of science fiction at the moment.

I know. I looked into the idea a nanofactory and nanomachines back in the days. Also the idea of molecular machine(mostly construct by chemist). The idea about the article I posted is that it is more main stream in terms of 3D printing, which is more effective than controlling moving nanomachines to construct the product. This gets me pretty excited.

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