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Question sound hammer damage objects in room


gamer87
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I was inside a closed room and I used a hammer in wood and metal, the noise and sound and sound waves generated by the hammer beating may have damaged and cracked objects and DVD discs that are inside the same room?

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For the oscillations of an object to diverge ( get larger and larger ), such that the structural integrity of the object is compromised ( your DVD cracks ), the force pushing it has to be provided with a specific timing ( or even multiples thereof ) so that the object, or disc, is always pushed in the same direction. This tends to rienforce the diflection until breakage. Think of a boxer on a speed bag.
If it comes at arbitrary intervals, or at odd multiples, the force will not cause a divergence and failure, because each succeeding application of the force is 'fighting' the previous one. Think of an amateur on a speed bag.

And then, of course, there is the miniscule amount of energy that will be transferred  acoustically ( by air molecules ) in all directions ( as opposed to a specific drection ). Think of an old man on a speed bag, who keeps missing.

( sorry for the 'loose' explanation; I got the impression you're not scientifically confident )

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3 minutes ago, MigL said:

For the oscillations of an object to diverge ( get larger and larger ), such that the structural integrity of the object is compromised ( your DVD cracks ), the force pushing it has to be provided with a specific timing ( or even multiples thereof ) so that the object, or disc, is always pushed in the same direction. This tends to rienforce the diflection until breakage. Think of a boxer on a speed bag.
If it comes at arbitrary intervals, or at odd multiples, the force will not cause a divergence and failure, because each succeeding application of the force is 'fighting' the previous one. Think of an amateur on a speed bag.

And then, of course, there is the miniscule amount of energy that will be transferred  acoustically ( by air molecules ) in all directions ( as opposed to a specific drection ). Think of an old man on a speed bag, who keeps missing.

( sorry for the 'loose' explanation; I got the impression you're not scientifically confident )

In my case what will happen? hammer will generate sound waves in all directions of the room damaging everything and dvd?
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Yes, to the first part of your question.; sound ( pressure pulses ) will be generated in all directions.
No, to the second part; the sound waves will damage nothing.

The only plausible scenario is the hammer slipping out of your hand, and hitting your disc case.

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1 minute ago, MigL said:

Yes, to the first part of your question.; sound ( pressure pulses ) will be generated in all directions.
No, to the second part; the sound waves will damage nothing.

The only plausible scenario is the hammer slipping out of your hand, and hitting your disc case.

what is the explanation for the sound waves produced by the hammer not to damage anything through air and sound displacement?

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I gave them in my first reply.

Your ear drum is much more delicate than a DVD.
Does it get damaged when you hammer ?

( and for the rest of you smart-as*es, I'm referring to acute damage from a few hammer blows, not chronic danage from months and years of continuous hammering )

Edited by MigL
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2 minutes ago, MigL said:

If your ear drum is not damaged, neither will your DVDs !!!

to cause any damage what would have to happen? doesn't the sound of hammering cause it? frequency or intensity or volume of sound?

Edited by gamer87
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1 minute ago, gamer87 said:

I just want an explanation as to why the use and hammering of wood and metal inside a closed room will not cause sound waves and crack objects by the sound wave noise

Thank you for the better English.

There will be no resonance induced damage to to DVD's because they are just lying around.

There may be objects in the room that could resonate but they will be like the bridge in Sensei's post.

They will be suspended or strung up in some way.

Consider this.

A slack string will not pick up sound vibrations

A stretched string can pick them up. (this is called resonance)

You can hear this without damaging your ear.

 

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3 hours ago, studiot said:

No

Technically, it depends on the nature of sound emitted by the drill and the object(s) within the room under question, but in the VAST vast majority of situations your answer of NO is certainly correct. 

‘I’m increasingly convinced we’re chatting with a bot, though. 

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39 minutes ago, iNow said:

Technically, it depends on the nature of sound emitted by the drill and the object(s) within the room under question, but in the VAST vast majority of situations your answer of NO is certainly correct. 

‘I’m increasingly convinced we’re chatting with a bot, though. 

Being kind, I am working on the "youngster who is working through a translator" theory.

So 'No' was the sort of simplification one makes in such cases, at least at the outset.

 

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