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The affect of space weather


bear33
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Does space weather affect the space crafts` launches and do scientists check it before space crafts go to space? I know there is such a fact like space turbulence and it can influence a spacecraft, but can space weather?

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5 minutes ago, bear33 said:

Does space weather affect the space crafts` launches and do scientists check it before space crafts go to space? 

I assume if there was a large CME there may be a delay in the launch to minimize radiation exposure.

5 minutes ago, bear33 said:

I know there is such a fact like space turbulence and it can influence a spacecraft, but can space weather?

I don't believe there is such a thing as space turbulence.

edit:  Space weather has to do with the solar wind, which is about the amount of charge particles from the sun.  This has nothing to do with an actual wind or turbulence in space.

Edited by Bufofrog
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8 minutes ago, Bufofrog said:

I assume if there was a large CME there may be a delay in the launch to minimize radiation exposure.

I don't believe there is such a thing as space turbulence.

According to the information I`ve just found.When there is a strong space radiation storm that can har satellites, launches might be delayed. It his can also be the case with strong solar flares that could interfere with communications. I wonder, wether it can affect space shuttles? 

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11 minutes ago, bear33 said:

According to the information I`ve just found.When there is a strong space radiation storm that can har satellites, launches might be delayed. 

Yes, that is what I said.

12 minutes ago, bear33 said:

It his can also be the case with strong solar flares that could interfere with communications. 

Solar flares are what causes radiation storms.

14 minutes ago, bear33 said:

I wonder, wether it can affect space shuttles? 

It could if the shuttles were still flying.

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11 minutes ago, Bufofrog said:

Yes, that is what I said.

Solar flares are what causes radiation storms.

It could if the shuttles were still flying.

Can it be dangerous for the crew and for the spacecraft? I mean cand it cause a dissaster like it happens with air crafts when they get in storm?

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If you're thinking beyond low-Earth orbit there's also the interaction of solar activity and the Van Allen belts, which can be influenced by more subtle solar activity than CMEs, as well as various other factors. I believe Apollo just burned through it as quick as possible to minimise exposure, but if we ever get to a point where humans frequently traverse this zone it might be taken into account. But that's not a dramatic effect like you're envisioning, just an increased lifetime risk of some diseases.

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1 hour ago, bear33 said:

Can it be dangerous for the crew and for the spacecraft? I mean cand it cause a dissaster like it happens with air crafts when they get in storm?

You have a misconception about space weather.  If a huge solar storm hit the space station, they would not feel anything!  They would, however get a big dose of radiation.

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The main influence is on technical systems. As a result, failures in the electric power system or equipment generally fail. This is most relevant for northern and southern countries. So in 1989, the local power grid in Quebec went out of order, and, accordingly, the entire population of Quebec was without electricity for 9 hours. The next largest loss is the impact on aviation associated with the recently opened transpolar routes that fly passengers from Europe to the United States. When a magnetic storm, a solar flare, and particle ejection occurs, an increase in the radiation background occurs there, moreover, there is also an interruption in radio communications, which is especially dangerous from the point of view of air traffic control. Therefore, planes either stand until this is over (usually several hours), or are forced to fly along a long route and, accordingly, spend more fuel. In both cases, airlines incur losses. The third impact relates to users of navigation satellite systems such as GPS.

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