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nec209

Well finding protein markers for the human body for set type of many markers?

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When the human body organs go bad or have trouble working say in heart failure, heart disease, kidney failure, bladder problems, cancer, lung problems so on, does it have type of protein marker that is released in the blood? What are these protein markers?

 

Why does Irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulitis, leaky gut, Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) ,Inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer not have protein markers?

 

Also how are these protein markers analyzed?

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Yes and no. For the most part no or at least it is not as easy. Generally speaking your blood proteome correlates with your current condition, but it is fairly dynamic. I.e. it changes during the day, depends on how much you eat or drink, whether you are stressed or not and so on. There are certain proteins that start increasing if there are damages, but they are not always specific (e.g. certain inflammation markers) and those that are more specific tend to be markers that are associated with serious injury (with e.g. cause the leakage of those proteins into the bloodstream). And even then it is often necessary to combine several protein biomarkers and/or other biomarkers (e.g. creatinine levels and other indicators) in order to make a proper diagnosis. Disease that are much less well defined, such as many of those you have listed generally only display generic markers such increased inflammation. The reason for that is pretty clear. Injury and inflammation, regardless of origin, tend to affect similar pathways and it is unclear where there is a simple yes/no response. More likely we see quantitative differences. However, they could depend a lot on the individual (i.e. individual may have different healthy baselines) making them not trivial to use clinically.

There are efforts to identify and build biomarker panels (i.e. groups of proteins) that together might diagnose issues typically using proteomic techniques, but success rates have been low with some successes. Also, there are non-protein biomarker candidates, such as DNA modifications in the case of colon cancer.

Finally, once there is a candidate in actual clinical use typically protein levels are measured via ELISA, as those are the most robust to handle. For discovery, mass spectrometry is typically used.

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On 11/23/2020 at 6:05 PM, CharonY said:

Yes and no. For the most part no or at least it is not as easy. Generally speaking your blood proteome correlates with your current condition, but it is fairly dynamic. I.e. it changes during the day, depends on how much you eat or drink, whether you are stressed or not and so on. There are certain proteins that start increasing if there are damages, but they are not always specific (e.g. certain inflammation markers) and those that are more specific tend to be markers that are associated with serious injury (with e.g. cause the leakage of those proteins into the bloodstream). And even then it is often necessary to combine several protein biomarkers and/or other biomarkers (e.g. creatinine levels and other indicators) in order to make a proper diagnosis. Disease that are much less well defined, such as many of those you have listed generally only display generic markers such increased inflammation. The reason for that is pretty clear. Injury and inflammation, regardless of origin, tend to affect similar pathways and it is unclear where there is a simple yes/no response. More likely we see quantitative differences. However, they could depend a lot on the individual (i.e. individual may have different healthy baselines) making them not trivial to use clinically.

There are efforts to identify and build biomarker panels (i.e. groups of proteins) that together might diagnose issues typically using proteomic techniques, but success rates have been low with some successes. Also, there are non-protein biomarker candidates, such as DNA modifications in the case of colon cancer.

Finally, once there is a candidate in actual clinical use typically protein levels are measured via ELISA, as those are the most robust to handle. For discovery, mass spectrometry is typically used.

Well the above post explains it and sadly the human body is more complex as lot of popular science like to point out the holy grail by year 2050 may be we may have lab on chip a small microchip that looks at the blood and protein and can diagnose. And most likely that never will come to be if it is 50 years from now or 100 years from now that just the way human body built.

It is sad but the way the human is built things like lab on chip will alway be scfi.
 

May be the medical tricorder will have better luck in 50 or 100 years from now.

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