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motlan

another reason time will terminate

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3 hours ago, motlan said:

all functions on a graph extends in both directions, in the positive direction and negative direction.  the variables of the equation extends in the positive direction first followed by the negative direction to equal to zero.  for example the sine graph goes in the positive direction and negative direction.  In the positive direction the path of this circular function goes clockwise, in the negative direction it goes counterclockwise.  sine 90 degrees is 1.  sine negative 90 degrees is -1.  time is a coordinate in relativity which must be treated as positive direction terminated followed by negative direction back to the point of origin to equal to zero (equilibrium).  In the physics of an air conditioner to generate cold air it must release hot air that expels outside.  however eventually the cold air and hot air on earth eventually unite and neutralize on earth, this is the reverse order to equal to zero (equilibrium) the arrow of entropy eventually reverses.  Time is the same way.  

Ok my math is feeble but when did functions are plotted first in the positive side and then in the negative side 

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2 hours ago, Sriman Dutta said:

Ok my math is feeble but when did functions are plotted first in the positive side and then in the negative side 

 

2 hours ago, Sriman Dutta said:

Ok my math is feeble but when did functions are plotted first in the positive side and then in the negative side 

all functions of physics on a graph extends in both directions however they cannot go in both directions at the same time.  Usually the variables of the physics equation equate to the positive direction of the line or curve and terminate due to the finite value of the variables.  upon termination, it will extend in the negative direction of the function from the point of origin.  the key principle of classical mechanics is opposite direction equal magnitude for all equations.  so a positive value plus the same value negative value equals zero. it is assymetric in the math and physics and you can clearly see it in the graph.  case in point my reverse order math.  E=MCsquared + zero, move the MC squared over the equal sign and you get E - MC squared = zero.  the  same function can also be expressed as Zero + E=MC squared.  Move it across the equal sign and you get -E+MCsquared=zero.  Notice the energy and mass variables transition from positive to negative referring to opposite direction equal magnitude.  My simple manipulation of the same equation refers to equal to zero on both ends.  This is clearly stated in the function when you graph any equation.  It will reverse the effect in the opposite direction.  Time as time frames like all equations must obey this math.

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2 minutes ago, motlan said:

all functions of physics on a graph extends in both directions

The temperature scale does not.

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Just now, studiot said:

The temperature scale does not.

In engineering the only way to make an air conditioner produce cold air is to exhaust hot air outside the window.  obviously, hot air is a positive temperature while cold air is a negative temperature.  in that respect the temperature goes both directions.

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26 minutes ago, motlan said:

In engineering the only way to make an air conditioner produce cold air is to exhaust hot air outside the window.  obviously, hot air is a positive temperature while cold air is a negative temperature.  in that respect the temperature goes both directions.

Have you not heard of absolute zero (of temperature) ?

There is no such thing as negative intensity of illumination or intensity of sound, or any term in an equation that is a squared quantity.

Just accept that you overreached yourself with that earlier silly statement that all quantities in Physics can be  both negative and positive.

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22 minutes ago, studiot said:

Have you not heard of absolute zero (of temperature) ?

There is no such thing as negative intensity of illumination or intensity of sound, or any term in an equation that is a squared quantity.

Just accept that you overreached yourself with that earlier silly statement that all quantities in Physics can be  both negative and positive.

the negative intensity of illumination you are referring to is the negative direction of illumination thus negative direction versus positive direction (opposite directions).  sound can move in both negative direction and positive direction.

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2 minutes ago, motlan said:

the negative intensity of illumination you are referring to is the negative direction of illumination thus negative direction versus positive direction (opposite directions).  sound can move in both negative direction and positive direction.

None of that makes any scientific sense.

Also ,when someone tells you that "There is no such thing as negative intensity of illumination ", it is unlikely to be helpful to start your reply 

3 minutes ago, motlan said:

the negative intensity of illumination

It makes it look as if you are soapboxing and refusing to learn.

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31 minutes ago, motlan said:

the negative intensity of illumination you are referring to is the negative direction of illumination thus negative direction versus positive direction (opposite directions)

I said intensity not direction.

Just stop and think about this for a moment.

Suppose there was such a thing as negative intensity of illumination.
That would mean that any object or space that possessed this property could be illuminated without result until the illumination was strong enough to overcome this 'negative illumination'.

Can you offer any examples of this ?

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3 hours ago, motlan said:

In engineering the only way to make an air conditioner produce cold air is to exhaust hot air outside the window.

No. There are other ways.

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13 hours ago, motlan said:

 

all functions of physics on a graph extends in both directions however they cannot go in both directions at the same time.  Usually the variables of the physics equation equate to the positive direction of the line or curve and terminate due to the finite value of the variables.  upon termination, it will extend in the negative direction of the function from the point of origin.  the key principle of classical mechanics is opposite direction equal magnitude for all equations.  so a positive value plus the same value negative value equals zero. it is assymetric in the math and physics and you can clearly see it in the graph.  case in point my reverse order math.  E=MCsquared + zero, move the MC squared over the equal sign and you get E - MC squared = zero.  the  same function can also be expressed as Zero + E=MC squared.  Move it across the equal sign and you get -E+MCsquared=zero.  Notice the energy and mass variables transition from positive to negative referring to opposite direction equal magnitude.  My simple manipulation of the same equation refers to equal to zero on both ends.  This is clearly stated in the function when you graph any equation.  It will reverse the effect in the opposite direction.  Time as time frames like all equations must obey this math.

What did you do to the equation?

 

Your entire passage sounded me to like: here's positive, negative, both direction, negative direction, E=mc squared, E=0+mcsquared, blah blah...

Wish to learn before you theorise? Follow the textbooks. 

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21 hours ago, motlan said:

the negative intensity of illumination you are referring to is the negative direction of illumination thus negative direction versus positive direction (opposite directions).  sound can move in both negative direction and positive direction.

Intensity is not a vector quantity.

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