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Erina

ACV Acetobacter growth un UV conditions

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Direct sunlight usually has a detrimental affect on chemical substances, but I have been reliably informed that the growth of Acetobacter (Mycoderma aceti or "Mother") in Apple Cider Vinegar can be accelerated when exposed to UV light (A/B?).

Is there evidence that UV can accelerate Mother growth, and will it damage the nutrients in the acidic vinegar solution ?

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The mother is mostly cellulose and UV radiation seems to increase cellulose production. Wouldn't necessarily be good for the bacteria themselves though.

From what I've read, companies normally increase oxygen availability to improve production rates.

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It's a mixture of the two, Wikipedia lists oxygen as a main catalyst requirement for growth, but in the sun had me worried.

Do you know if an artificial light source such as LED light would have a similarly positive effect, and if there is a wavelength of which would not damage the bacteria, but still allow growth ?

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15 hours ago, Erina said:

It's a mixture of the two, Wikipedia lists oxygen as a main catalyst requirement for growth, but in the sun had me worried.

Do you know if an artificial light source such as LED light would have a similarly positive effect, and if there is a wavelength of which would not damage the bacteria, but still allow growth ?

I don't know of any lighting used in industrial vinegar production. Might still make for some interesting experiments  if you want to give it a shot.

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The problem is the wavelength, the cost and controlled conditions, all of which I cannot meet.

Unless it is practiced in industry then it's too much of a long shot for me right now, unfortunately.

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I found an American study online which shows the following :

"The FL, traditionally used in growth rooms, led to higher growth rates and deposition of S and G lignins, greater cellulose content, and higher expression of cellulose-synthase 4 (BbCESA4) and cellulose-synthase 7 (BdCESA7) genes."

ref: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5909483

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3 hours ago, Erina said:

I found an American study online which shows the following :

"The FL, traditionally used in growth rooms, led to higher growth rates and deposition of S and G lignins, greater cellulose content, and higher expression of cellulose-synthase 4 (BbCESA4) and cellulose-synthase 7 (BdCESA7) genes."

ref: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5909483

Only thing is they have to use sugar to make cellulose. Has to be some kind of tradeoff going on.

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23 hours ago, Erina said:

I found an American study online which shows the following :

"The FL, traditionally used in growth rooms, led to higher growth rates and deposition of S and G lignins, greater cellulose content, and higher expression of cellulose-synthase 4 (BbCESA4) and cellulose-synthase 7 (BdCESA7) genes."

ref: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5909483

As Endy mentioned, the light does not affect the bacteria positively, but plants that produce cellulose and other materials that can be used for consumption. For the most part especially UV is harmful to bacteria as they induce oxidative stress as well as other damages in bacteria. Just for clarifciation, the guys producing acetic acid are bacteria, i.e. the mentioned Acetobacter aceti.

 

Edit: I should add that there are of course photosynthetic bacteria do benefit from UV-light (below harmful doses, of course). But the bacterium in question is not one of them.

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