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logic001

theory about the maximum power energy

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Information technology have constant form: zero(0) & one(1)

With zero(0) is no conductive electricity, or "0" is no electricity.

And one(1) is conductive electricity, or "1" is have electricity.

 

OK, this is about information tech. And now I want to associate with physics:

"0" is no power energy

"1" is have power energy

But in information tech not mean electricity stronger or weaker in "1" value.

 

But in physics field, if we intergrate with this recipe:

1 = 1/10 x 10 = 1/100 x 100 = 1/1000 x 1000 = 1/1000.. x 1000.. = 1

1 = 0,1 x 10 = 0,01 x 100 = 0,001 x 1000 = 0,00...1 x 1000.. = 1

In final conclusion, value "1" is have power and it is maximum power with no stronger or weaker!!!

 

If you have only the battery R6P - UM3 - AA Size 1,5V with 200mAh is very weak for household, beacuse it only 1,5V x 0,2A = 0,3W, but for a common house use 8 - 15kWh

But in the maximum of "1" value meaning the big power energy containing: P(Watt) = U(Volt) x I(Ampe), 0,3W x 3W = 0,9W ~ 1W, 

0,001W x 1000W = 1W

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1 hour ago, logic001 said:

OK, this is about information tech. And now I want to associate with physics:

"0" is no power energy

"1" is have power energy

But in information tech not mean electricity stronger or weaker in "1" value.

This is only true of ideal, perfect components.

Real world components can only support so much load which is why circuit engineers talk about

fan in and fan out and component manufacturers include buffers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan-in

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan-out

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Yeah...1 and 0 are more symbolic representations than actual. May want to look at something like non-return to zero encoding.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-return-to-zero

1 might be ~+12 volts and 0 might be ~-12 volts for instance.

Should note that everything is still analog if you scratch beneath the surface.  It'll rarely ever be exactly some value, rather it'll be within a range and that is what we use as our digital signal.

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6 hours ago, logic001 said:

Information technology have constant form: zero(0) & one(1)

With zero(0) is no conductive electricity, or "0" is no electricity.

And one(1) is conductive electricity, or "1" is have electricity.

 

 

With TTL logic, any voltage between  2 and 5 volts is a "1", and anything from 0 to 0.8 volts is a "0".  (the range in between is undefined).

For CMOS, it is anything above 70% of the source voltage is a "1" and anything below 30% is a "0".

You can have voltage and power usage even with a "0".

Also, as pointed out in a previous post, loading is an issue.  If an output from a logic gate is connected to too many inputs, those inputs can drag the output voltage down.  Even if it is trying to output a "1", it may only be able to get the output voltage into the undefined region, or not even out of the "0" region.  This is what buffers are for. They help keep the output in the "1" range when it needs to be,  but they do so by drawing extra energy from the power source.

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