Jump to content

Examples of Awesome, Unexpected Beauty in Nature


joigus
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, joigus said:

Rocks and shrimp, very nice. I wonder if the shrimp is venomous. Blue is generally associated to venomous.

No, they are not venomous. 

"The spotted cleaner shrimp (Periclimenes yucatanicus), is a kind of cleaner shrimp common to the Caribbean Sea. These shrimp live among the tentacles of several species of sea anemones. They sway their body and wave their antennae in order to attract fish from which they eat dead tissue, algae and parasites."

Spotted cleaner shrimp - Wikipedia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, joigus said:

To those involved in this thread, please try to add some info about the thing. You don't have to write a PhD dissertation, a pointer would be enough.

Thank you.

My pic said "Tonga Geological Services" on the right margin, which I figured was fairly self-explanatory.  However, your reasonable comment did remind me that if someone looked at this in a few years and didn't see the margin credit, they might wonder what event they were seeing.  The figure I heard for the force of the explosion was ten megatons, btw.  As for PhD dissertations, I wouldn't be surprised if a grad student somewhere will write one using data collected from this eruption.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, TheVat said:

My pic said "Tonga Geological Services" on the right margin, which I figured was fairly self-explanatory.  However, your reasonable comment did remind me that if someone looked at this in a few years and didn't see the margin credit, they might wonder what event they were seeing.  The figure I heard for the force of the explosion was ten megatons, btw.  As for PhD dissertations, I wouldn't be surprised if a grad student somewhere will write one using data collected from this eruption.  

Thanks a lot. I did miss the "vertical caption." ;) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

main-qimg-c36b5fb5bf43c8be25f6801fe63a9dd3

main-qimg-7140f9dc928e4921985cc2dd642c068b

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Naslaa   https://www.quora.com/

The Al Naslaa rock formation is a rock formation located 50 km south of the Tayma oasis in Saudi Arabia. It has been split down the middle into two parts, both of which are balanced on small pedestals.[1] The cause of the split is unknown, but is posited to be due to natural causes including windblown sand and periodic rain.[2]

The rock is approximately 6 metres high and 9 metres wide, and is covered on its south-east face with numerous petroglyphs

main-qimg-b0294a76dd0ce8b209448a914ce1c5ac

https://www.quora.com/

That male lions have this amazing life where they don’t hunt and get easy meals. They often get portrayed as freeloaders who occasionally patrol the territory.

So for example, this is a rare sighting of five male lions drinking water together:

 

They are brothers and were part of the Mapogo coalition.

They ruled for an unusually long time, nearly a decade. Most males that survive to adulthood only rule a pride for two years.

The Mapogo coalition fathered many many cubs.

They also brutally killed more than 100 other lions, mostly males, and cubs. This behavior isn’t uncommon.

Everything eventually came full circle.

Each of them eventually died a terrible death at the hands of other males. It was brutal, prolonged gang-up-style violence by a group of six brothers who then came and took over. Deaths usually took hours, with bursts of biting and scratching the chosen maimed lion.

This is an extremely common cause of death for males.

Lions are very brave and majestic, and people get excited just by the mere topic and sight of them. Rightfully so.

But they aren’t particularly bright or gentle animals. The line between bravery and stupidity is razor-thin and it often gets males killed, charging into enemy territory, trying to fight three other males at once. They don’t stick together when it is obviously safer to do so. They take on high-risk prey and blow out their knee, sentencing themself to starvation.

Do females do most of the hunting? Yes.

But being born a female lion is a way better deal. They live longer and don’t have to deal with nearly as much intraspecies violence. Given a choice between the two, you’d want to choose to be a female 10/10.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

main-qimg-ad1c1202e4479f4d39722dc4e7ee698b

https://www.quora.com/     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex

I hereby introduce you to Demodex. It’s a kind of mite that lives in the follicles of your eyelashes and comes out at night to have sex on your face.

Most people have it.

But aside from the gross-out factor, it doesn’t appear to be harmful, so doctors don’t bother with it except in cases of allergy or such a high density that there’s obvious symptoms such as itching or rosacea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, beecee said:

main-qimg-ad1c1202e4479f4d39722dc4e7ee698b

https://www.quora.com/     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex

I hereby introduce you to Demodex. It’s a kind of mite that lives in the follicles of your eyelashes and comes out at night to have sex on your face.

Most people have it.

But aside from the gross-out factor, it doesn’t appear to be harmful, so doctors don’t bother with it except in cases of allergy or such a high density that there’s obvious symptoms such as itching or rosacea

My arthropod is much friendlier - langusta, smiling :)  [Spiny lobster - Wikipedia]

d9eoghu-5adeaf4e-993a-452f-9871-da2b35a1e886.jpg?token=eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJ1cm46YXBwOjdlMGQxODg5ODIyNjQzNzNhNWYwZDQxNWVhMGQyNmUwIiwiaXNzIjoidXJuOmFwcDo3ZTBkMTg4OTgyMjY0MzczYTVmMGQ0MTVlYTBkMjZlMCIsIm9iaiI6W1t7InBhdGgiOiJcL2ZcL2FlNDdlNmMyLTk0MGItNDY5Ni1hYWJmLWIzZTYxZWE3MmM5N1wvZDllb2dodS01YWRlYWY0ZS05OTNhLTQ1MmYtOTg3MS1kYTJiMzVhMWU4ODYuanBnIn1dXSwiYXVkIjpbInVybjpzZXJ2aWNlOmZpbGUuZG93bmxvYWQiXX0.e1B8LlLOZB5ClXxA2oQlzAlxJa-W21ynBkFjCdLoLcU

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, beecee said:

main-qimg-ad1c1202e4479f4d39722dc4e7ee698b

https://www.quora.com/     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex

I hereby introduce you to Demodex. It’s a kind of mite that lives in the follicles of your eyelashes and comes out at night to have sex on your face.

Most people have it.

But aside from the gross-out factor, it doesn’t appear to be harmful, so doctors don’t bother with it except in cases of allergy or such a high density that there’s obvious symptoms such as itching or rosacea

I look much worse when I just wake up.

16 hours ago, beecee said:

But being born a female lion is a way better deal. They live longer and don’t have to deal with nearly as much intraspecies violence. Given a choice between the two, you’d want to choose to be a female 10/10.

You gotta love lions and lionesses. Wild animals have it very hard. Even a humble magpie. None of us would wanna trade deals with them.

Cheers mate! And thanks for the wonderful photos and info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

From APOD and I believe worth an entry in this thread. Reminds me somewhat of the Hubble deep field.

See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

The Fornax Cluster of Galaxies
Image Credit & Copyright: Marco Lorenzi, Angus Lau, Tommy Tse

Explanation: Named for the southern constellation toward which most of its galaxies can be found, the Fornax Cluster is one of the closest clusters of galaxies. About 62 million light-years away, it is almost 20 times more distant than our neighboring Andromeda Galaxy, and only about 10 percent farther than the better known and more populated Virgo Galaxy Cluster. Seen across this two degree wide field-of-view, almost every yellowish splotch on the image is an elliptical galaxy in the Fornax cluster. Elliptical galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 1404 are the dominant, bright cluster members toward the upper left (but not the spiky foreground stars). A standout barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is visible on the lower right as a prominent Fornax cluster member.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

image.thumb.png.7295a969b498f0d9a5fc1ec490045c2d.png

I’m currently on a skiing trip and these natural sculptures of snow-covered trees make me think of pareidolia* and what triggers the phenomenon. How come I could easily spot a “yeti” but no “elephants”? Is pareidolia affected by the context? I do not know but my curiosity is triggered…

 

By the way, here in the middle, is where I see the "yeti" :-)

Spoiler

image.png.94f60e0f068e83af6c9b09ce78feb805.png

 

*) Pareidolia is the tendency for perception to impose a meaningful interpretation on a nebulous stimulus, usually visual, so that one sees an object, pattern, or meaning where there is none. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareidolia 

Edited by Ghideon
grammar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/3/2022 at 9:53 PM, Ghideon said:

image.thumb.png.7295a969b498f0d9a5fc1ec490045c2d.png

I’m currently on a skiing trip and these natural sculptures of snow-covered trees make me think of pareidolia* and what triggers the phenomenon. How come I could easily spot a “yeti” but no “elephants”? Is pareidolia affected by the context? I do not know but my curiosity is triggered…

 

By the way, here in the middle, is where I see the "yeti" :-)

  Reveal hidden contents

image.png.94f60e0f068e83af6c9b09ce78feb805.png

 

*) Pareidolia is the tendency for perception to impose a meaningful interpretation on a nebulous stimulus, usually visual, so that one sees an object, pattern, or meaning where there is none. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareidolia 

I think I can see at least three yetis there. :D 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This underwater garden is created by fire corals. Beautiful to look at, but quite painful to touch. Actually, these colonies are not true corals, but other cnidarians.

d9aoaww-1d99b833-a9b5-49ae-895b-b6babd8071b1.jpg?token=eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJ1cm46YXBwOjdlMGQxODg5ODIyNjQzNzNhNWYwZDQxNWVhMGQyNmUwIiwiaXNzIjoidXJuOmFwcDo3ZTBkMTg4OTgyMjY0MzczYTVmMGQ0MTVlYTBkMjZlMCIsIm9iaiI6W1t7InBhdGgiOiJcL2ZcL2FlNDdlNmMyLTk0MGItNDY5Ni1hYWJmLWIzZTYxZWE3MmM5N1wvZDlhb2F3dy0xZDk5YjgzMy1hOWI1LTQ5YWUtODk1Yi1iNmJhYmQ4MDcxYjEuanBnIn1dXSwiYXVkIjpbInVybjpzZXJ2aWNlOmZpbGUuZG93bmxvYWQiXX0._GeSDB2lGNvyxiC2wwDHjP43SlVn5uoQfidPK2PBTKo

Here is another:

d9aoabz-02a707e7-c491-42af-ab72-5bd075d1aaf4.jpg?token=eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJ1cm46YXBwOjdlMGQxODg5ODIyNjQzNzNhNWYwZDQxNWVhMGQyNmUwIiwiaXNzIjoidXJuOmFwcDo3ZTBkMTg4OTgyMjY0MzczYTVmMGQ0MTVlYTBkMjZlMCIsIm9iaiI6W1t7InBhdGgiOiJcL2ZcL2FlNDdlNmMyLTk0MGItNDY5Ni1hYWJmLWIzZTYxZWE3MmM5N1wvZDlhb2Fiei0wMmE3MDdlNy1jNDkxLTQyYWYtYWI3Mi01YmQwNzVkMWFhZjQuanBnIn1dXSwiYXVkIjpbInVybjpzZXJ2aWNlOmZpbGUuZG93bmxvYWQiXX0.mon7n1SHjedJSPpPZxwFoW5xD6WzfN4BoLj4W6t3UZY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, joigus said:

Very nice. I think those fish are feasting on some stuff...

I suspect that the corals were spawning and the fish were feasting on the eggs which were slowly floating upward.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the last one was a Namib elephant, but I don't think it is. It's probably a big tusker from Tsavo, in Kenya.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2019/mar/20/the-last-of-africas-big-tusker-elephants-in-pictures

Thanks for the pictures.

On 3/6/2022 at 7:42 PM, Genady said:

I suspect that the corals were spawning and the fish were feasting on the eggs which were slowly floating upward.

That's exactly what it looks like. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.