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Examples of Awesome, Unexpected Beauty in Nature


joigus
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23 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

Na, he'll just blame it on the fog of war... 🙂

He's the only one who's objected to the beauty standards of this thread. But he didn't mention any wars...

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4 minutes ago, joigus said:

He's the only one who's objected to the beauty standards of this thread. But he didn't mention any wars...

I hesitate to object, since this is in the lounge, but isn't a fog a way to obscure what we see?

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3 hours ago, joigus said:

As always, we should ask the beholder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_mole-rat

I think they are. But I'm no expert on beauty.

Let's ask @MigL.

I have no problem with rats, snakes, snails, croccodiles, etc.
It is only photographs of creepy-crawlies of the insect variety, that leave me feeling as if  they are crawling all over me ...

And yes, it is especially bad in fog, when you can't see the little bast*rds.

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24 minutes ago, MigL said:

I have no problem with rats, snakes, snails, croccodiles, etc.
It is only photographs of creepy-crawlies of the insect variety, that leave me feeling as if  they are crawling all over me ...

And yes, it is especially bad in fog, when you can't see the little bast*rds.

Try not to think about a fog that swirls around you quickly before vanishing, leaving you unexpectedly covered in bugs! STOP!

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1 hour ago, MigL said:

I have no problem with rats, snakes, snails, croccodiles, etc.

Naked mole rats are not really rats, and they're not just any mammals:

Quote

Resistance to cancer

Naked mole-rats have a high resistance to tumours, although it is likely that they are not entirely immune to related disorders.[22] A potential mechanism that averts cancer is an "over-crowding" gene, p16, which prevents cell division once individual cells come into contact (known as "contact inhibition"). The cells of most mammals, including naked mole-rats, undergo contact inhibition via the gene p27 which prevents cellular reproduction at a much higher cell density than p16 does. The combination of p16 and p27 in naked mole-rat cells is a double barrier to uncontrolled cell proliferation, one of the hallmarks of cancer.[23]

In 2013, scientists reported that the reason naked mole-rats do not get cancer can be attributed to an "extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan" (HMW-HA) (a natural sugary substance), which is over "five times larger" than that in cancer-prone humans and cancer-susceptible laboratory animals.[24][25][26] The scientific report was published a month later as the cover story of the journal Nature.[27] A few months later, the same University of Rochester research team announced that naked mole-rats have ribosomes that produce extremely error-free proteins.[28] Because of both of these discoveries, the journal Science named the naked mole-rat "Vertebrate of the Year" for 2013.[29]

In 2016, a report was published that recorded the first ever discovered malignancies in two naked mole-rats, in two individuals.[22][30][31] However, both naked mole-rats were captive-born at zoos, and hence lived in an environment with 21% atmospheric oxygen compared to their natural 2–9%, which may have promoted tumorigenesis.[32]

The Golan Heights blind mole-rat (Spalax golani) and the Judean Mountains blind mole-rat (Spalax judaei) are also resistant to cancer, but by a different mechanism.[33]

(Wikipedia)

Sharks are also very resistant to tumours. I don't know what this has to do with beauty, but it does have a lot to do with the unexpected. Nature is truly amazing.

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2 hours ago, MigL said:

I have no problem with rats, snakes, snails, croccodiles, etc.
It is only photographs of creepy-crawlies of the insect variety, that leave me feeling as if  they are crawling all over me ...

And yes, it is especially bad in fog, when you can't see the little bast*rds.

Like this?

A nest of huntsman spiders found inside a timber box in meant for pygmy possums.

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24 minutes ago, joigus said:

I don't think MigL would have any problem with those. They're not of the insect variety. ;)

I would!!😬

For MigL.............

Dried cockroaches are ready to be sold to pharmaceutical companies from a farm in Jinan, China. One farmer says the insects are easy to raise and profitable.

r/Damnthatsinteresting - Park in Australia completely covered in spider webs. Due to their appearance, locals refer to these types of webs as “angel hair“ (Photo: Leslie Anne Schmidt)

The Australian region of Gippsland encountered a phenomenon knowns as ballooning, where spiders move to higher ground after heavy rains and flooding.

 

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Ball's Pyramid  Photo Bryden Allen

Balls.jpg

The above is a photo of Ball's Pyramid, a rocky outcrop near Lord Howe Island off the coast of NSW. Lord Howe Island can be seen in the background.

https://gripped.com/profiles/heard-balls-pyramid-pretty-epic/

The seven-million-year-old 562-metre formation is the remnant of a shield volcano and caldera that stands about 20 kilometres southeast of Australia’s Lord Howe Island. It is the tallest volcanic stack in the world.

The Climb

It was first attempted in 1964 by the Australian team, but they ran out of supplies and turned back. On Valentines Day 1965, Bryden Allen, John Davis, Jack Pettigrew and David Witham became the first to stand on top. Then in 1979, Smith climbed it with John Worrall and Hugh Ward and planted a New South Wales flag and declared it Australian territory.

Ball's Pyramid route Topo by Bryden Allen

Edited by beecee
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