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is education being regenerated?


ahmet
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4 minutes ago, Strange said:

Does The Doctor learn something from each of his new incarnations?

:) :) ok. I provide one observed report to ensure you understand more clearly. 

Once coronavirus deteceted and it had been a pandemic issue many countries announced that the some educational processes would not go on as in its normal system.

although turkey intented to continue in its normal process after a significant amount of time,the system has not started or continued normally

but one thing continued: "distance learning."

now,I am not sure whether everything would be same even if the cure or the vaccine of this disease be found after an undefined/unknown time period. 

meanwhile, there is no effective result in the current case to say that  disease has been eradicated.

I also believe if the pandemic is not a planned action, its cure or vaccine might take very much amount of time to be found,this is the reason why the humanity could not find the cure or vaccine for HIV. anyway, this is another disccussion here, as the time for cure or accine to be found is unpredictable, can we really say that everything would be same  (specifically for education)? 

 

 

 

 

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So, the question is: Is education being reinvented / restructured [because of the pandemic]?

Probably. But as with so much of the "the world has changed" hype, I suspect that it will only be a short term change. Before long, everything will be back exactly as it was before.

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Panta rhei

That's in the nature of things.

Changes require adaptations, which bring about further changes, which require further adaptations.

Were it football, I would be worried, if I cared about football at all.

Education is different. It was there millenia before football, and it will be there long after football becomes a hazy memory.

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17 minutes ago, Strange said:

So, the question is: Is education being reinvented / restructured [because of the pandemic]?

Probably. But as with so much of the "the world has changed" hype, I suspect that it will only be a short term change. Before long, everything will be back exactly as it was before.

no,not thoroughly. 

Because there are some contexts in science of education (but I can't provide sources in english before making a research,most of sources that I know are in turkish relevant to this issue ) 

but succintly : covid 19 is only a trigger or an indirect tool for this. 

the contexts that I imply on this issue claim that some more realistic and more modern usages should be available (this system presumably/probably is called as "constructive/contemporary education system" in english)

 

 

 

Edited by ahmet
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It is allowing us to rethink the idea of online learning and remote participation. Most local school districts in the US have been resistant to online learning as primary, and the stay at home process has made that much more acceptable and less feared by millions. 

The risk with this is the lack of broadband internet for so many hundreds of thousands of children, and also the challenges parents face working when kids are taught from home. It also increases the risk of hunger for kids whose only meals came from schools, and also the risk of abuse detection for kids at home with abusive parents (as the teacher would detect bruises and wounds in-person and get help for the child, but those opportunities to detect abuse are not happening with online learning). 

Another gap is socialization and the non-book / non-syllabus learning which comes with school... learning how to sort ourselves as social animals and all the informal playground learning and side conversations that help make us who we become. 

2 hours ago, Strange said:

Does The Doctor learn something from each of his new incarnations?

*her (and yes!)

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2 hours ago, iNow said:

It is allowing us to rethink the idea of online learning and remote participation. Most local school districts in the US have been resistant to online learning as primary, and the stay at home process has made that much more acceptable and less feared by millions. 

The risk with this is the lack of broadband internet for so many hundreds of thousands of children, and also the challenges parents face working when kids are taught from home. It also increases the risk of hunger for kids whose only meals came from schools, and also the risk of abuse detection for kids at home with abusive parents (as the teacher would detect bruises and wounds in-person and get help for the child, but those opportunities to detect abuse are not happening with online learning). 

Another gap is socialization and the non-book / non-syllabus learning which comes with school... learning how to sort ourselves as social animals and all the informal playground learning and side conversations that help make us who we become. 

*her (and yes!)

Good summary.  Having just recently retired from teaching I see many challenges here.  Certainly, until now, online learning has been underutilized, but in some areas where it is used it is not used well.  Case in point is Math.  Quite a number of schools now do online instruction in Math, but the success rate has been uneven.  I suspect the issue is that online systems cannot always detect why a student gets a wrong answer and provide the correct guidance (making students do math on paper and reviewing the actual paper is a very important part of math instruction).  But-- there are efforts to overcome these type of issues and COVID has given us the impetus to take on the challenges.  More to the point of the OP-- I think the answer is that education is being changed.  We are very, very, lucky that the development of online learning was already well underway before the virus arose.  I do not, however, think we will do away altogether with physical schools.  Socialization is an important part of education, along with activities like art, music, performing arts, and similar things that do not so easily lend themselves to online studies.

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