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martillo

Fully Hydraulic Motor - Free for development and production!

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Posted (edited)

I have developed a totally innovative "Fully Hydraulic Motor" which I submitted to an automotive company and local university lot of years ago. Not any feedback received on it so I post it here for if someone in the world could be interested. I´m not interested in the production patent rights, may be just to be mentioned as the original author of the concept.

It is based on an electronical concept applied in hydraulics.

Here is the two pages pdf I wrote to present it: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1J_LnpLlhbFTY-wPqEOk2G5z7545BB674/view?usp=sharing

Any comment is welcome.

 

Fully Hydraulic Motor Diagram.JPG

Edited by martillo
concept

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49 minutes ago, martillo said:

Any comment is welcome.

Why "fully" hydraulic ?  What fluid is in the combustion chambers; and what forces the diaphragms to compress upwards what enough; and what does "cooling" cools ?  Reciprocal flow is passed to a full wave rectifier analogy of one -way valves to make it unidirectional.

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, Externet said:

Why "fully" hydraulic ?  What fluid is in the combustion chambers; and what forces the diaphragms to compress upwards what enough; and what does "cooling" cools ?  Reciprocal flow is passed to a full wave rectifier analogy of one -way valves to make it unidirectional.

"Fully Hydraulic" because there's only hydraulic fluid from the combustion pistons to the wheels' turbines and all the mechanical parts of a conventional vehicle are replaced by the "hydraulic rectifier" and the mobile shafts of the turbines.

It continues to be a combustion motor. I think it could be gasoline (2T or 4T) or diesel.

Cooling of the diaphragm is necessary to not burn with the heat coming from the pistons.

While one of the pistons descends the other ascends and reciprocally. The hydraulic fluid makes that.

 

 

Edited by martillo

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How is this better than a regular crankshaft and connecting rods?

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, pzkpfw said:

How is this better than a regular crankshaft and connecting rods?

Well, no crankshaft, no flywheel,  no clutch, no transmission box, no differential… I think it would be much more simple to fabricate and maintain and also be much lighter…

 

Edited by martillo

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Posted (edited)

Internal combustion engines that use pistons have two design problems.  First,  they must operate at some minimum RPM so that the vehicle is not subject to the significant vibrations due to individual explosions in cylinders.  Second, they have maximum RPM limitations due to the conversion of linear to rotary motion, the loads on bearings and the attendant stresses.  In a conventional system we have a flywheel and a transmission which serve to smooth the vibrations due to individual cylinder explosions and to give the vehicle the ability to accomplish speeds of zero to over 100 MPH (160 kph) while the pistons move in relatively small rpm range that allows them to function well.  Your diagram does not appear to address these issues.  How do you anticipate going from near zero velocity to high velocity while keeping the piston system operating in the relatively narrow range that will produce smooth energy flow without over-stress due to high RPM?

Edited by OldChemE
clarity

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, OldChemE said:

A couple of questions:  1.  In a conventional system we have a transmission which has multiple gears to allow for different speed ranges while keeping the movement of the pistons in a range where they will operate well.   Your diagram does not appear to have this.  How do you anticipate going form near zero velocity to high velocity while keeping the piston system operating in a range that will produce smooth energy flow without over-stress due to high RPM?  2:  combustion engines have flywheels so that the pulsations due to the individual pistons do not produce pulsations (vibrations) in the movement of the wheels.  How will your system accomplish this?

The wheels' turbines would have blades with variable angles. That would be equivalent to the transmission box. At angle 0 the fluid pass trough without producing force in the shaft. At some angle it will produced maximum rotation of the shafts and so the wheels.

About pulsations I think some pressure absorbing dispositive like a chamber with  piston and spring could diminish them. That is not shown in the diagram for simplicity.

You edited your post but I think this one well answers it. If not just make me know.

Edited by martillo

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Posted (edited)

NOTE:

It must be pointed out that what is presented here is just a simple diagram of the concept of a "Fully Hydraulic Motor" and it may be many improvements must be made to put it to work fine.

For instance, the diaphragm could be wider than the combustion piston, a pressure stabilization mechanism would be needed as pointed out by OLDChemeE, a mechanic coupling of the pistons could improve stability, other hydraulic mechanism could improve vehicles' braking, ignition and combustible injection should be developed, special wheels' turbines with mobile blades must be developed, etc, etc.

The aim here is to present the concept for it to be developed further by anyone interested...

Edited by martillo

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