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Curious layman

How to see comet Neowise

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Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) isn’t what astronomers call a great comet. But it’s a wonderful binocular comet that began gracing our early morning skies in early July. Now it’s visible in the evening, as soon as the sky gets really dark. We’ve been hearing from people throughout the Northern Hemisphere who’ve seen this comet, and we’ve heard from a few who have spotted it from Southern Hemisphere locations.

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Location of Comet NEOWISE from July 27 to August 2, 2020. Facing west-northwest shortly after dusk, as seen from the U.S. See how the curve in the Big Dipper’s handle points to the bright star Arcturus? For a specific view – shortly after your local dusk – from your specific location on the globe, try Stellarium. Illustration by Eddie Irizarry using Stellarium.

https://earthsky.org

 

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The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the closest images yet of the sky’s latest visitor to make the headlines, comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE, after it passed by the Sun. The two images in this video were take three hours apart on 8 August 2020 and features the comet’s prominent jets that are emerging from the nucleus. Credit: NASA, ESA, Q. Zhang (California Institute of Technology), A. Pagan (STScI), and M. Kornmesser

https://phys.org/news/2020-08-hubble-snaps-close-up-comet-neowise.html

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