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zengwl17206

How to learn medical science as a non-medical science major?

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Posted (edited)

I am a graduate student majoring in math. I hope to master some medical science knowledge at some higher level, as in medical schools. I do not expect myself to be a doctor. Still, I am eager to develop some insight into human physiology and pathology. In particular, I am mostly interested in pharmacology, neurology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. 

I list below some general questions that are always in my mind. I would feel very, very grateful if anyone can give me some suggestions.

  1. I have been learning organic chemistry and physiology at Khan Academy since January of this year. I also watch videos on a Youtube channel called Speed Pharmacology. I find these videos very concise and informative. While I am watching the videos, I would take notes and review them several times later. Yet, I have no idea how to look for other/more advanced material after watching all of the videos. Does anyone have suggestions of reliable sources of texts/videos/websites where I can learn more about medical science?
  2. Which site is the best to look for medical science papers? I know in astrophysics, people generally go to http://adswww.harvard.edu/. I believe in medical science, there should also be some websites similar to that, where we can search for the papers in medical science.
  3. Which forum other than this one do you typically use if you have some specific medical questions?
Edited by zengwl17206
grammar error

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1) The best thing to read are entry level textbooks. They provide a broader overview but more importantly, also provide context which you generally do not find from from short videos. I generally found that the latter make you feel that you understand a topic, but they usually do not convey actual understanding.

2) Typical websites to use are Pubmed. Web of science is also good for specific searches, but you generally need to access them from the uni. Google scholar also works but if you are not sure with the keywords can take a while to look through.

 

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Posted (edited)

the things you are able to do are that :

1) you could enroll biophysics or physiology (MSc) at medical science institutions.  (but I do not recommend this in general if you are not so much eager and ...something more (more talents required because this way is a bit  containing some significant risks ))

2) you could read articles/thesis in medical science. it either cases, your opportunities will be  limited. 

according to modern guidance/educational system you will  select all of your options/preferences by your own. 

I was also mathematician , but do not prefer to describe myself as a mathematician anymore. 

TIPS THAT I CAN SHOW YOU (based on my experiences):

1) you might try to change your work style. (remember, you have been working by writing almost everything you hear and you say but as of now,...)

2) you might consider to learn something else (that contains applications) rather than reading useless theoretic papers :)  

3) you might need to stop your sentences starting with "if ..." 

4) you should not leave the reality / real life. 

5) you may need to be patient.

 

 

Edited by ahmet

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4 hours ago, zengwl17206 said:

Still, I am eager to develop some insight into human physiology and pathology. In particular, I am mostly interested in pharmacology, neurology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. 

To what end? Do yo want build mathematical models for medical/physiological applications? Do you want to keep doors open so that later you could move into a medical career? Are you just inherently interested in the subject but don't plan on applying any knowledge?

Knowing your goal should help you focus on what you need.

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Prometheus said:

To what end? Do yo want build mathematical models for medical/physiological applications? Do you want to keep doors open so that later you could move into a medical career? Are you just inherently interested in the subject but don't plan on applying any knowledge?

Knowing your goal should help you focus on what you need.

@Prometheus No. I will focus on my major during the five-year PhD stretch. In my career, I will focus on mathematics/engineering, and I won't move on to a medical career. I am trying to learn medical/physiological knowledge out of interest. However, I am not satisfied learning it as an amateur. I want to learn it at a high level, as those who are qualified as nurses, for example. Unfortunately, the institute I am at now is Georgia Tech, which does not have a medical department.

12 hours ago, CharonY said:

1) The best thing to read are entry level textbooks. They provide a broader overview but more importantly, also provide context which you generally do not find from from short videos. I generally found that the latter make you feel that you understand a topic, but they usually do not convey actual understanding.

2) Typical websites to use are Pubmed. Web of science is also good for specific searches, but you generally need to access them from the uni. Google scholar also works but if you are not sure with the keywords can take a while to look through.

 

@CharonYThanks! Sometimes I feel there are too many entry-level textbooks, and I am unsure which ones to choose. Do you have specific suggestions for the textbooks?

Edited by zengwl17206

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That is difficult to say. There are openstax books that you could check out first, as they are free. While I do use them occasionally for some topics (I do not teach human physiology) most I found not to be too much to my liking. But that does not mean that expensive books are automatically better, of course. My suggestion is to look into books that are for non-biology majors (e.g. for nursing) which tend to be written more fundamental and read some chapters if available. That alt east gives you a sense whether you would be interested in reading the rest.

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Posted (edited)

GUYTON is being referenced for phsiology (but more ,as I know for neurophysiology and biophysics. )

Edited by ahmet

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