Jump to content
fredreload

Argon plasma energy testing

Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, fredreload said:

Something like star formation, the factor I need to add in is pressure.

You can't make stars from argon.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, John Cuthber said:

Do you actually plan to answer the question?

Well I was kdding(non offensively). The real answer is I am trying to find an algorithm to get the amount of energy I need. If this answer is of importance to you @@?

Just now, Strange said:

You can't make stars from argon.

 

Yes but stars has pressure in their formation. I want to pressurize my plasma so it becomes dense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, fredreload said:

The real answer is I am trying to find an algorithm to get the amount of energy I need. If this answer is of importance to you

Of course it is important. How can anyone answer your nonsensical questions if we don't understand the reasons behind them.

You have been told the ionisation energy of argon. What more do you need to know?

This happens to all your threads: you ask some fairly meaningless questions, we try to explain some basic physics related to what you ask, you respond by posting even more nonsense.

As this thread is apparently just a joke, I will request it is closed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Strange said:

Of course it is important. How can anyone answer your nonsensical questions if we don't understand the reasons behind them.

You have been told the ionisation energy of argon. What more do you need to know?

This happens to all your threads: you ask some fairly meaningless questions, we try to explain some basic physics related to what you ask, you respond by posting even more nonsense.

As this thread is apparently just a joke, I will request it is closed.

Well alright, it appears in my computer so it is mine, just saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The weird thing is that you can find a concentration of about 10^31 electrons per cubic metre in most of the universe.

A hydrogen atom has a volume of about 6*10^-31 cubic metres, and contains 1 electron.

What you are talking about is a million times higher- (because  there are 100 cm in a metre).
So, we need to find something where the electrons are pulled into an even smaller space.

One way to do that would be to increase the charge on the nucleus- Instead of using hydrogen, we can use uranium  with 92 times the change.
It's a bit tricky y to strip off all but one of the electrons, but it's not impossible. 

That gets us into this realm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen-like_atom

And I think that , using tehNohr model, the radius is inversely proportional to the charge. (though it's safe to assume that relativity screws that calculation.)

In which case you can, in principle create a very small volume of  space, very near the nucleus of a transuranic element, where the electron density is that high.

 

Calculating the effective temperature is left as an exercise for the interested reader.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Strange said:

Of course it is important. How can anyone answer your nonsensical questions if we don't understand the reasons behind them.

You have been told the ionisation energy of argon. What more do you need to know?

This happens to all your threads: you ask some fairly meaningless questions, we try to explain some basic physics related to what you ask, you respond by posting even more nonsense.

As this thread is apparently just a joke, I will request it is closed.

It is like a leap of faith @@

26 minutes ago, John Cuthber said:

The weird thing is that you can find a concentration of about 10^31 electrons per cubic metre in most of the universe.

A hydrogen atom has a volume of about 6*10^-31 cubic metres, and contains 1 electron.

What you are talking about is a million times higher- (because  there are 100 cm in a metre).
So, we need to find something where the electrons are pulled into an even smaller space.

One way to do that would be to increase the charge on the nucleus- Instead of using hydrogen, we can use uranium  with 92 times the change.
It's a bit tricky y to strip off all but one of the electrons, but it's not impossible. 

That gets us into this realm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen-like_atom

And I think that , using tehNohr model, the radius is inversely proportional to the charge. (though it's safe to assume that relativity screws that calculation.)

In which case you can, in principle create a very small volume of  space, very near the nucleus of a transuranic element, where the electron density is that high.

 

Calculating the effective temperature is left as an exercise for the interested reader.

 

 

 

 

Appreciate it, that seems like a fission, fusion realm to me :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fredreload said:

It is like a leap of faith @@

!

Moderator Note

That’s out of place here. 

“Can X happen” is a very different question from “Can X happen under conditions A, B and C”  If you don’t give specifics you’re wasting peoples’ time. Threads like this are arguably in violation of our “good faith” rule.

If you have physics questions ask them in the correct forum. If you post in speculations you are expected to actually post your speculation and provide the rigor we require.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.