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Do inorganic macromolecules exist?

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Hii!! I would like to know if all macromolecules are considered organic, since I've been trying to search for the inorganic ones but nothing came up. A few examples were given such as rubber, polypropylene and polyethylene, which are synthetic and do contain carbon. It has led me to believe the term "inorganic" is not being used as it is, and it's actually referring to the synthetic macromolecules. I would be really grateful if someone could explain this to me. Thank you and sorry for my English!!Hope you're having a great day!!

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How about amorphous structures of silica like in sands and quartz type crystals? Or any inorganic crystal structure? I guess you could class them as macro molecular structures.

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I'd say plastics and some waxes, but I'm not sure. Some waxes are produced by organisms, though.

I don't consider too tight categorical thinking very useful. Some theories of how life evolved involve rocks. But I'd love to know what the experts have to say.

I would say covalent bonds in the main chain is a must.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, joigus said:

I'd say plastics and some waxes, but I'm not sure

These are all carbon containing and classed as organic.

Amorphous silicates are macro molecular and inorganic.   This covers aerogels, silica nano particles,  quartz like structures and the like.  You can get polymers where the backbones are made from silicon too.

Edited by DrP

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10 hours ago, DrP said:

These are all carbon containing and classed as organic.

Amorphous silicates are macro molecular and inorganic.   This covers aerogels, silica nano particles,  quartz like structures and the like.  You can get polymers where the backbones are made from silicon too.

I see. Thank you +1. My memory was blurry. Germanium wouldn't work for polymer backbones, would it?

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1 hour ago, joigus said:

Thank you +1. My memory was blurry. Germanium wouldn't work for polymer backbones, would it?

Thank you.   Not sure with Germanium.. quick Google Search mentions some Co polymers containing it... I'd have to read them more closely. I will check them out when I get the time.  Interesting stuff.

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Will this do?

zeolite.thumb.jpg.151f6596fe0f1acb5061852164488780.jpg

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6 hours ago, studiot said:

Will this do?

 

Boy, that's beautiful!

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Metal organic frameworks are very popular at the moment. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal–organic_framework
 

They contain organic components as well obviously, but the area sits much more squarely with inorganic chemistry. 
 

I suspect that the examples given by the OP were used to distinguish synthetic and naturally occurring macromolecules, though it is a bit confusing as rubber can  also be naturally occurring. 

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21 minutes ago, DrP said:

I read an article about those in a magazine a couple of years ago. Fascinating

Definitely.

I'm mainly intrigued by their application to air purification in space. Huge game changer from needing to use amines, which both add complexity and leave the air smelling of ammonia.

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Interesting question of definition; does a diamond count as organic, or inorganic?

Some definitions include CH bonds...
Anyway, I think quartz is probably the commonest inorganic macromolecule.

Molybdenum blue is one of the oddest

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ja512758j

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