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TxAlien

COVID 19 - Prevention and Treatment using Bacterial Immunization

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Posted (edited)
There are several hundred different types of bacteria in the human body. Most of them are harmless, while some are even beneficial to humans. 
The number of bacteria in the human body is comparable to or even greater than the number of regular human cells [1].
By weight, bacteria comprise about 1-3% for a typical person. When a person acquires immunity, it is usually assumed that this is his or her own cells that have acquired the ability to fight the infection.  However, if the bacteria themselves also contribute to developing immunity, it would open up new ways to treat diseases including COVID-19.  It wouldn't matter if the bacteria are trying to save their habitat or are simply trying to defend themselves against a viral infection.
 
Instead of looking to induce the right response to the disease in the immune system, we can try to find ways to directly immunize the bacteria present in humans
We can either vaccinate the bacteria that is already present inside the human body or we can introduce immunized bacteria that are able to recognize and kill the virus right away.
 
This theory would also explain the disappearance of viral epidemics. Epidemics do not disappear because the virus mutates or becomes less aggressive,
but because non-infected people get immunity from bacteria that was acquired from people already protected from the disease.
 
 
Author: Alex P
 
References:
[1] Sender, R. Are We Really Vastly Outnumbered? Revisiting the Ratio of Bacterial to Host Cells in Humans . — Cell Press , 2016. — January (vol. 164, no. 3). — P. 337—340
Edited by TxAlien
Error in topic title

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Moderator Note

Moved to Speculations. Note that this section of the forum requires you to provide evidence to support your claims.

 

 

12 minutes ago, TxAlien said:

When a person acquires immunity, it is usually assumed that this is his or her own cells that have acquired the ability to fight the infection.

It is not an assumption; we can detect the antibodies.

13 minutes ago, TxAlien said:

However, if the bacteria themselves also contribute to developing immunity, it would open up new ways to treat diseases including COVID-19

Do you have any evidence that this is the case?

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I've already read that the scientists know the above and have already made reference to things like the bodies own immune system fighting off the COVID-19, but sometimes the individual persons immune system goes into overdrive and floods the lungs and then kills the person, which is just one reason why the immune system alone cannot defend against COVID-19. IVARMECN is a known drug that kills coronavirus but might not be fully compatible for COVID-19. If this were a man made virus based on over 6500 deaths per day then I hope they have a good vaccine behind the schemes to stop it when the numbers drop because if it is genuine and no vaccine is found based on the numbers of deaths, the human race will surely dwindle.  

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1 minute ago, Casio said:

I've already read that the scientists know the above and have already made reference to things like the bodies own immune system fighting off the COVID-19, but sometimes the individual persons immune system goes into overdrive and floods the lungs and then kills the person, which is just one reason why the immune system alone cannot defend against COVID-19. IVARMECN is a known drug that kills coronavirus but might not be fully compatible for COVID-19. If this were a man made virus based on over 6500 deaths per day then I hope they have a good vaccine behind the schemes to stop it when the numbers drop because if it is genuine and no vaccine is found based on the numbers of deaths, the human race will surely dwindle.  

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Moderator Note

Do not hijack other peoples threads with your own speculations. Especially when it includes crackpot conspiracy theories. Thank you.

 

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None of this make sense. Bacteria are not infected by eukaryotic viruses, and immunity is an entirely different mechanism. Adaptive immunity in eukaryotes is target specific. It is like trying to get the innate ability to fly by cuddling ducks.

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On 4/21/2020 at 12:12 AM, TxAlien said:
There are several hundred different types of bacteria in the human body. Most of them are harmless, while some are even beneficial to humans. 
The number of bacteria in the human body is comparable to or even greater than the number of regular human cells [1].
By weight, bacteria comprise about 1-3% for a typical person. When a person acquires immunity, it is usually assumed that this is his or her own cells that have acquired the ability to fight the infection.  However, if the bacteria themselves also contribute to developing immunity, it would open up new ways to treat diseases including COVID-19.  It wouldn't matter if the bacteria are trying to save their habitat or are simply trying to defend themselves against a viral infection.
 
Instead of looking to induce the right response to the disease in the immune system, we can try to find ways to directly immunize the bacteria present in humans
We can either vaccinate the bacteria that is already present inside the human body or we can introduce immunized bacteria that are able to recognize and kill the virus right away.
 
This theory would also explain the disappearance of viral epidemics. Epidemics do not disappear because the virus mutates or becomes less aggressive,
but because non-infected people get immunity from bacteria that was acquired from people already protected from the disease.
 
 
Author: Alex P
 
References:
[1] Sender, R. Are We Really Vastly Outnumbered? Revisiting the Ratio of Bacterial to Host Cells in Humans . — Cell Press , 2016. — January (vol. 164, no. 3). — P. 337—340

Viruses only affect certain cells with a specific genome, meaning that bacteria are likely to be indifferent to a virus that affects certain cells of the human body and they simply do not need to be immune to this virus. Bacteria and fungi are constantly at war with each other for living space, for which they produce antibiotics, but viruses are insensitive to antibiotics.

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