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13mh13

Non-human pandemics

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Dear "Biology Experts" and everyone else. How're y'all doin'? Been away ... I was in the hole for while for ... uh .. offensive behavior. 

But all that aside ... here's an easy, topical query I'm sure many of you "Experts" can answer with certainty ...

Where is info, if any, on animal (non-human) pandemics (or epidemics)? Don't bring up bat white nose syndrome, but you may bring up bees (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_collapse_disorder).

Hell, you can even bring in plant pandemics (blights, etc, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blight).

But large mammals -- and esp. primates -- is the cash cow here, folks.

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9 hours ago, iNow said:

They tend more often to be epidemics than pandemics since most nonhuman primates lack the ability to cross the ocean. 

But many animals (including mammals) are MARINE. And most of the viruses on the planet are MARINE. And most of the viral infections are bacteria-based (which fits my non-human criteria). 

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10 hours ago, iNow said:

They tend more often to be epidemics than pandemics since most nonhuman primates lack the ability to cross the ocean. That said, here ya go:

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150327-ten-scary-diseases-of-animals

Yeah +1

25 minutes ago, 13mh13 said:

But many animals (including mammals) are MARINE. And most of the viruses on the planet are MARINE. And most of the viral infections are bacteria-based (which fits my non-human criteria). 

 

Ouch my ears.

😬

Most viruses are marine ? please explain further?

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45 minutes ago, 13mh13 said:

But many animals (including mammals) are MARINE. And most of the viruses on the planet are MARINE. And most of the viral infections are bacteria-based (which fits my non-human criteria). 

Using a quick wikipedia search, I find that there are 5,450 species of mammals. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammal of which 130 are marine, living or recently extinct https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_marine_mammal_species. sure 130 could be considered 'many'. Now if you meant aquatic, then yes there are many animals that are (semi)aquatic

How do you determine, 'most viral infections'... there are many many more bacteria than animals, so are we just counting numbers, or do you mean that there are more bacteriophages than regular viruses (if so, please post a source, I'm interested). 

How can a virus be 'marine', as Studiot mentioned? Or do you mean that viruses can persist within the ocean. That seems to be true; https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19475721003743843 link to marine specific viruses (bacteriophages specifically I think): https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/025544v1
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_bacteriophage

 

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3 hours ago, 13mh13 said:

many animals (including mammals) are MARINE

Not primates, though... and that was YOUR OWN criteria from the OP:

 

13 hours ago, 13mh13 said:

large mammals -- and esp. primates -- is the cash cow here, folks.

 

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