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karlsultana8

About combining elements together...

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Posted (edited)

Is it possible to combine 3 elements (tholium, silver and silicon) together, such that under the microscope they appear separate and discrete from each other? Therefore each element will be located on the sample seperate from the others.

If you melt them together using a furnace you'll find all elements in any one area.

Thanks

 

 

Edited by karlsultana8
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You could powder them then sinter them.
I have no idea why you would bother.

 

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Could that process be done in 1979 without too much trouble e.g. expensive equipment, etc.?

There's a video of a scientist analyzing a metal sample in 1979. https://youtu.be/xZmBW69OO1I 

He says, (in the final part at 39:00), that he could not do that.

Quote: 

Quote

 

I could not explain the type of material that I have in its discreteness by any known combination of materials. I could not put it together myself as a scientist. To get a combination of Tholium, Silver and Silicon in discreet areas, yes if I were to melt it together I'd see the evidence of all of it, but their discreteness is what intriges me.

If I where to put these combinations and put it in a furnace, melt it... I would see all the elements present there in any one area. But I don't see this descreet bits of material.

 

I'm trying to understand if what he says is true or not. Unfortunately the video is a bit long but I would have wished someone viewed it all because he analyzes this metal sample in detail.

Thanks

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43 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

Could that process be done in 1979 without too much trouble e.g. expensive equipment, etc.?

Such a process could probably have been done (with available materials) at almost any time after the stone age.

The challenge would be the availability of those elements in their elemental form. Silver is easy: it is found as the elemental metal in nature. Silicon wasn't extracted from the oxide until the start of the 19th century. And, of course, there is no such thing as "tholium". Thorium, maybe? Also extracted early in the 19th century.

So it could have been done in 1850.

43 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

There's a video of a scientist analyzing a metal sample in 1979. https://youtu.be/xZmBW69OO1I 

I am not going to watch because (1) it is a video and therefore the worst source of information known to man and (2) it appears to be about UFOs and therefore consists of lies and fairy tales. As evidenced by the bit you quote.

43 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

I'm trying to understand if what he says is true or not. 

Of course not. It is a video about UFOs.

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" mass manufacturing of PM products did not begin until the mid or late 19th century"
From

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powder_metallurgy#History_and_capabilities

tells us that it would have been a well established technology by the late 20th Century.
So , yes, it would have been trivially easy to do it in 1979

 

(I have to admit I misread "tholium" as thulium. )
Mixing real elements is usually easy.
Mixing in stuff that doesn't exist is more difficult.

 

12 hours ago, karlsultana8 said:

He says, (in the final part at 39:00), that he could not do that.


Well, maybe he couldn't, but I could.

Do you want to believe me, or the guy who declared himself incompetent?

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3 minutes ago, John Cuthber said:

(I have to admit I misread "tholium" as thulium. )

Hadn't heard of thulium before. There are just too many of those lanthanides to bother with :-)  

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5 minutes ago, Strange said:

Hadn't heard of thulium before.

It's a strong contender for "least useful element".

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7 minutes ago, John Cuthber said:

It's a strong contender for "least useful element".

Unless you are building a UFO, apparently.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, John Cuthber said:

It's a strong contender for "least useful element".

 

Anti-counterfeiting for Euro?

Edited by Endy0816

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16 hours ago, karlsultana8 said:

Unfortunately the video is a bit long but I would have wished someone viewed it all because he analyzes this metal sample in detail.

As he clearly doesn't know what he is talking about, I would suggest that his claim that the material consists of "a combination of Tholium, Silver and Silicon in discreet areas" is probably just a made up story. His "analysis" is a work of fiction.

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The element is Thulium, I mispelled it.

So one man could do this, back in the 70's, (even with Thulium) assuming I explained what the scientist said as clearly as I could.

And just for curiousity, he also says the follow in video:

1. Samples contain almost all of the elements of the periodic table.

2. Samples contain the hard to obtain element Thulium with its secondary bands missing in the EDS spectrum.

3. Inclusions in the metal sample exhibit birefringence, which is found in non-metallic or dielectric crystals.

4. Sample examined at a magnification of 500 diameters show signs of micro-manipulation or micro machining.

Again, hope I'm accurate in this... I don't really know if that's something impressive or not.

Thanks!

 

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23 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

I don't really know if that's something impressive or not.

Not.

Especially as it is probably all made up.

Quote

1. Samples contain almost all of the elements of the periodic table.

"Almost all" is meaningless.

And in what proportions? After all the, Earth contains almost all the elements in the periodic table. So if a sample contained the most common elements in roughly the proportions they appear in nature, then it would not be particularly surprising.

29 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

2. Samples contain the hard to obtain element Thulium

If it contains "almost all of the elements" then that is not surprising. There are harder to obtain elements.

30 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

3. Inclusions in the metal sample exhibit birefringence, which is found in non-metallic or dielectric crystals.

Again, if contains "almost all of the elements" then that is not surprising.

31 minutes ago, karlsultana8 said:

4. Sample examined at a magnification of 500 diameters show signs of micro-manipulation or micro machining.

That is, presumably, a purely subjective opinion. And based on the other nonsensical claims, not worth considering.

 

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21 hours ago, karlsultana8 said:

1. Samples contain almost all of the elements of the periodic table.

That statement is true of my lunch, if you look carefully enough.

It's not a statement that would be made by anyone who actually knows the issues.

21 hours ago, karlsultana8 said:

Samples contain the hard to obtain element Thulium with its secondary bands missing in the EDS spectrum.

So... not actually thulium.
 

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