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SergUpstart

Betelgeuse (split from The speed of propagation of gravity)

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The day before yesterday there was good clear weather and I looked at Orion with the naked eye. The Rigel (in the lower right corner) shines the brightest there now, the brightness of Betelgeuse, Mintaka, Alnitaka, and Bellatrix is about the same.

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Here is the latest photo of Betelgeuse, which is published on the Internet. It refers to December 2019.

81c5ce663f251e15ec6264c630373510.jpg

It shows that the star has lost its Central symmetry. From this, we can make an assumption about what the gravitational waves detected on January 14, 2020 meant. They could indicate an event that occurred 640 years ago and was that the star turned over like a Janibekov's nut. If we had photos of the star for January 2020 at least one day apart, we could confirm or deny this assumption. If confirmed, we could measure the speed of gravitational waves with high accuracy.

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33 minutes ago, SergUpstart said:

Here is the latest photo of Betelgeuse, which is published on the Internet. It refers to December 2019.

81c5ce663f251e15ec6264c630373510.jpg

It shows that the star has lost its Central symmetry. From this, we can make an assumption about what the gravitational waves detected on January 14, 2020 meant. They could indicate an event that occurred 640 years ago and was that the star turned over like a Janibekov's nut. If we had photos of the star for January 2020 at least one day apart, we could confirm or deny this assumption. If confirmed, we could measure the speed of gravitational waves with high accuracy.

We don’t know for a fact that the GW event originated at Betelgeuse. It came from that direction.

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3 hours ago, swansont said:

We don’t know for a fact that the GW event originated at Betelgeuse. It came from that direction.

Perhaps, but where is the flash from that other event? It had to manifest itself either in the x-ray or in the visible range.   It is also possible that we are dealing with a false detection.

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GW events don't need a flash to accompany them. One of the difficulties in determining where a GW event originates is that you often have to triangulate from several detectors. This is aided somewhat by the cross polarizations and polarization angles however it is still a difficult process unless you can readily identify the source via other means such as a telescope or other signals.

By the way that image is showing the bow shock of Betelgeuse movement. Somewhere roughly 30 km/sec.

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1 hour ago, Mordred said:

By the way that image is showing the bow shock of Betelgeuse movement. Somewhere roughly 30 km/sec.

If you compare these two images, it seems that we are not dealing with a sharp blow, but with a time-stretched process

betelgeusebeforeafter.jpg

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A lot of the images you see are not what you see through a telescope. For instance you wouldn't see the bow shock of Betelgeuse through a telescope. You have to apply filtration etc. In some images you will also have artist rendering. (Though not in this particular case as it uses the Sphere telescope. That telescope uses polarization filters to filter out the brightness etc.

The bow shock of Betelgeuse is approximately 11 light years across, it will vary as the interstellar medium itself varies. 

You also must factor in that Betelgeuse has been dimming which is also part of what the image is showing. Ie different convection cells at different temperatures.

Edited by Mordred

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4 hours ago, Mordred said:

A lot of the images you see are not what you see through a telescope. For instance you wouldn't see the bow shock of Betelgeuse through a telescope. You have to apply filtration etc. In some images you will also have artist rendering. (Though not in this particular case as it uses the Sphere telescope. That telescope uses polarization filters to filter out the brightness etc.

The bow shock of Betelgeuse is approximately 11 light years across, it will vary as the interstellar medium itself varies. 

You also must factor in that Betelgeuse has been dimming which is also part of what the image is showing. Ie different convection cells at different temperatures.

Thank you!

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12 hours ago, SergUpstart said:

Perhaps, but where is the flash from that other event? It had to manifest itself either in the x-ray or in the visible range.  
 

No, that’s not true.

12 hours ago, SergUpstart said:

It is also possible that we are dealing with a false detection.

Possible but unlikely. The false positive rate is something like 1 in 25 years.

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