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Why is the earth at an angle?


Casio
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Was the earth always at an angle or was in knocked onto the angle it is at?

I'm told today that if the earth was not at its present angle, that we would not experience the changes in the weather and climate, is this true?

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1 hour ago, Casio said:

Was the earth always at an angle or was in knocked onto the angle it is at?

During formation of the Solar System there have been many proto planets collisions. One of such collisions created the Earth and the Moon as we know but Moon was much closer to the Earth.

1 hour ago, Casio said:

I'm told today that if the earth was not at its present angle, that we would not experience the changes in the weather and climate, is this true?

Yes. Also presence of the Moon stabilized and slowed down rotation of the Earth. It is not wobbling.

Edited by Sensei
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  • 10 months later...

 

On 2/16/2020 at 7:26 AM, Casio said:

Thanks for your input. 

I remember also reading that the axial tilt of the Earth is not a fixed quantity, and undergoes very tiny changes [getting less] probably due to tidal gravitational effects...which also explain the Moon moving ever so slightly further away and the Erath's day lengthening.

12 minutes ago, beecee said:

 

I remember also reading that the axial tilt of the Earth is not a fixed quantity, and undergoes very tiny changes [getting less] probably due to tidal gravitational effects...which also explain the Moon moving ever so slightly further away and the Erath's day lengthening.

Found this.......................

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axial_tilt

extract:

Earth currently has an axial tilt of about 23.44°.[8] This value remains about the same relative to a stationary orbital plane throughout the cycles of axial precession.[9] But the ecliptic (i.e., Earth's orbit) moves due to planetary perturbations, and the obliquity of the ecliptic is not a fixed quantity. At present, it is decreasing at a rate of about 47″[10] per century (see details in Short term below).

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