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Bmpbmp1975

Brown Dwarfs

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So been reading an article about brown dwarfs that were found. In the article it says 

In June 2018, citizen scientists flipping through the Backyard Worlds images noticed an unusual pairing: one object that appeared faint but moved fast--the telltale sign of a new brown dwarf--and another brighter object moving nearby and at the same rate. The Backyard Worlds science team was alerted and became immediately excited about this rare cosmic sighting.

 

so question I have these are failed stars what is meant by moving? Are there wandering around the Milkey way?

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/amon-csd021120.php

 

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9 minutes ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

 so question I have these are failed stars what is meant by moving?  

Is there some reason to think it's not the usual definition of moving?

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And now you've been corrected and know better.

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30 minutes ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

I didn’t realize that they move random around I thought stars were stationary 

Nearly all stars are orbiting the milky way at roughly the same speed. Some are a bit faster or a bit slower. Some are moving inwards a bit and some outwards. Some are moving "up" and some down. Some are orbiting others. Some have had interactions that cause them to be on a path that leaves the milky way. And so on.

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So they are orbiting and not just moving around randomly. So considering that this one is 79 ly from the sun it orbits the sun the same way as we do then?

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5 minutes ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

So they are orbiting and not just moving around randomly. So considering that this one is 79 ly from the sun it orbits the sun the same way as we do then?

No, these brown dwarfs are orbiting the galaxy, in the same way that our Sun is orbiting the galaxy.

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32 minutes ago, iNow said:

And now you've been corrected and know better.

Thank you for your support 

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As soon as any star in our galaxy becomes "stationary" (stops orbiting), it will head towards our supermassive black hole at the center.

14 hours ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

... noticed an unusual pairing: one object that appeared faint but moved fast--the telltale sign of a new brown dwarf--and another brighter object moving nearby and at the same rate.

Why is it a NEW brown dwarf?  Was it just discovered or did it form recently?

Any stars or brown dwarfs that are moving "fast" (relative to the other stars) would probably be stars getting thrown out of the Milky Way by interaction with our supermassive black hole at the center.  They are called "hypervelocity stars".  But usually the interaction would be a binary getting torn apart, one getting thrown out of the galaxy and the other getting eaten by the black hole.  I don't know how BOTH binary partners would get thrown out at high speed.  Can that happen?

Edited by Airbrush

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Sorry I didn't read the story before posting.  After reading your story, here's what I think.  These objects are not hypervelocity brown dwarfs.  "Moved fast" is how stars or asteroids are detected, compared to a stationary field of stars.  These are new only in that they were recently detected.  Their system is a few billion years old.

"They found that the T8 object has about 34 times the mass of Jupiter, and the L1 has about 72 times the mass of Jupiter. They are separated by 341 astronomical units..... The system is estimated to be a few billion years old."

Remarkable is how far apart they are, 341 astronomical units (341 X 93,000,000 = 31,713,000,000) or about 31 BILLION miles apart.  And yet they held together for billions of years.

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