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Kartazion

Quantum Chromodynamics with a Single Particle in Motion

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Is it possible that the origin of quantum chromodynamics, and at the level of strong interaction, is produced by the oscillation of a single particle in motion?
This mechanism would use a principle of oscillation of the particle between a virtual convergent point and correlated quarks.

1273311652_chromodynamic2.png.5073bc404593c589b620c835d1c4f032.png

 

I have already learned about this paper: Using the single quark transition model to predict nucleon resonance amplitudes

 

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1 hour ago, Kartazion said:

Is it possible that the origin of quantum chromodynamics, and at the level of strong interaction, is produced by the oscillation of a single particle in motion?

No. You cannot shoehorn QCD into a single particle. Due to the underlying symmetries required to make the (quite complicated) dynamics consistent, you need six separate quarks (along with their antiparticles) plus the gluon and the photon to make it all work. All of these are separate fields in the Lagrangian.

The article you referenced has nothing to do with reducing QCD down to a single quantum field. Frankly (without intending any disrespect towards you), I would be very surprised if you truly understood this very technical paper.

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Hello Markus,

21 minutes ago, Markus Hanke said:

… you need six separate quarks (along with their antiparticles) plus the gluon and the photon to make it all work. …

The core makes photon? This is in the case of disintegration?

22 minutes ago, Markus Hanke said:

The article you referenced has nothing to do with reducing QCD down to a single quantum field. 

Ok

23 minutes ago, Markus Hanke said:

Frankly (without intending any disrespect towards you), I would be very surprised if you truly understood this very technical paper.

You're right, it's complicated.

 

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3 hours ago, Kartazion said:

The core makes photon? This is in the case of disintegration?

No, the photons mediate the electromagnetic interaction between quarks, because quarks carry electric charge as well in addition to colour charge.

Edited by Markus Hanke

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4 hours ago, Markus Hanke said:

... Due to the underlying symmetries required to make the (quite complicated) dynamics ...

I am a beginner with Lagrangian field theory. The worst are the tensor fields and spinor fields.

But the thing I say to myself is that a lot of these equations (in quantum chromodynamics) are simply an incomprehensible bypass of Pauli exclusion.
Which is not a problem with the single particle principle.

 

29 minutes ago, Markus Hanke said:

No, the photons mediate the electromagnetic interaction between quarks, because quarks carry electric charge as well in addition to colour charge.

How does electromagnetism intervene with the strong interaction for quark operation? Or do you have a specific reference?
Thank you in advance.

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The Langrangians don't bypass the Pauli exclusion. Electromagnetism is mediated by photons the strong force between quarks is by gluons. To better understand Pauli exclusion you would need to study the symmetric and anti symmetric commutations of bosons vs fermions.

Edited by Mordred

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20 minutes ago, Mordred said:

... To better understand Pauli exclusion you would need to study the symmetric and anti symmetric commutations.

I only know CPT symmetry or SU(3) symmetry for QCD. Maybe that's what you're talking about, because I did not find anything on the symmetric and anti symmetric commutations.
I also saw this link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-symmetric_operator but I do not know what it's Worth.

Thanks

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57 minutes ago, Kartazion said:

I only know CPT symmetry or SU(3) symmetry for QCD. Maybe that's what you're talking about, because I did not find anything on the symmetric and anti symmetric commutations.
I also saw this link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-symmetric_operator but I do not know what it's Worth.

Thanks

It's the behavior under particle exchange. Particles with symmetric wave functions behave differently than those with antisymmetric wave functions.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/pauli.html

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3 hours ago, swansont said:

It's the behavior under particle exchange. Particles with symmetric wave functions behave differently than those with antisymmetric wave functions.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/pauli.html

Yes thanks. It's a story of fermion and boson (half-integer spin with antisymmetric wavefunctions (-), and particles of integer spin with symmetric wavefunctions (+))
Let the quarks on one side and the gluons on the other. The use of Pauli exclusion is only applied with fermions (antisymmetric). 
So now I understand better the writing of the principle.

What do you advise me next to understand better the QCD?

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List is huge but look into asymptotic freedom and conservation of color as it pertains to the eight fold Wayen, the meson  nonet,  and the baryon octet. You will need to understand the various conservation rules for viable quark combinations these include color, charge, flavor, isospin, parity, energy momentum and hypercharge

 Then you will also need to understand the Gell Mann matrices as well as the applicable coupling constants Ie the Yukawa couplings via the Higgs field. You will also need to study Yang Mills theory to better understand the non abelion SU (3) group.

 

 

Edited by Mordred

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2 hours ago, Mordred said:

List is huge but look into asymptotic freedom and conservation of color as it pertains to the eight fold Wayen, the meson  nonet,  and the baryon octet. You will need to understand the various conservation rules for viable quark combinations these include color, charge, flavor, isospin, parity, energy momentum and hypercharge

 Then you will also need to understand the Gell Mann matrices as well as the applicable coupling constants Ie the Yukawa couplings via the Higgs field. You will also need to study Yang Mills theory to better understand the non abelion SU (3) group.

:huh: I really have a job.

quantum-chromodynamics.png

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10 hours ago, Kartazion said:

What do you advise me next to understand better the QCD?

Before you even try to look into the particulars of QCD, I think it would be wise to learn about quantum field theory in general first (QCD being a quantum field theory). If you understand the basic principles of the underlying framework, things will become easier for you. 

Fair warning though - QFT is a notoriously difficult subject, and QCD a pretty complicated theory. But you’ll be able to pick up the gist of it quite easily.

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4 minutes ago, Markus Hanke said:

Before you even try to look into the particulars of QCD, I think it would be wise to learn about quantum field theory in general first (QCD being a quantum field theory). If you understand the basic principles of the underlying framework, things will become easier for you. 

Fair warning though - QFT is a notoriously difficult subject, and QCD a pretty complicated theory. But you’ll be able to pick up the gist of it quite easily.

Yes i will take care of the quantum field theory. Thanks for the support.

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