Jump to content
willem

Thermal conductivity of 2-propanol

Recommended Posts

Hello, I am currently doing my major in the feild of organic chemistry but cannot seem to find the thermal conductivity of 2-propanol/isopropyl in it's gaseous state. If anyone knows how to calculate this or would be able to help me find where to look I would be very grateful!

Edited by willem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ghideon said:

Is this what you are looking for?http://www.ddbst.com/en/EED/PCP/TCN_C95.php, Dortmund Data Bank, Thermal Conductivity of n-Propyl and Isopropyl Alcohols at Various Temperatures and Pressures

I just edited the post, I forgot to add that it was in its gaseous state, my bad. If you could help me with this I would be beyond grateful. But thanks for the quick reply!

I have looked through multiple CRC handbooks at the gas thermal conductivity section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is from the 15 th Edition of Lange's handbook of Chemistry (there are at least 2 newer editions)

2_propanol.thumb.jpg.9104940434ad3f0459a865d09dd1cc76.jpg

 

The units are

Quote

5.8 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY
TABLE 5.24 Thermal Conductivities of Gases as a Function of Temperature
The coefficient k, expressed in J · sec1 · cm1 · K1, is the quantity of heat in joules, transmitted per second
through a sample one centimeter in thickness and one square centimeter in area when the temperature difference
between the two sides is one degree kelvin (or Celsius). The tabulated values are in microjoules. To convert to
microcalories, divide values by 4.184. To convert to mW · m1 · K1, divide values by 10.

It's a bit skimpy, at a pinch you could compare with other close members of the homologous series for which more data is available.

 

Does this help?

1 hour ago, willem said:

Hello, I am currently doing my major in the feild of organic chemistry but cannot seem to find the thermal conductivity of 2-propanol/isopropyl in it's gaseous state. If anyone knows how to calculate this or would be able to help me find where to look I would be very grateful!

 

 

 

This is from the 15 th Edition of Lange's handbook of Chemistry (there are at least 2 newer editions)

2_propanol.thumb.jpg.9104940434ad3f0459a865d09dd1cc76.jpg

 

The units are

Quote

5.8 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY
TABLE 5.24 Thermal Conductivities of Gases as a Function of Temperature
The coefficient k, expressed in J · sec1 · cm1 · K1, is the quantity of heat in joules, transmitted per second
through a sample one centimeter in thickness and one square centimeter in area when the temperature difference
between the two sides is one degree kelvin (or Celsius). The tabulated values are in microjoules. To convert to
microcalories, divide values by 4.184. To convert to mW · m1 · K1, divide values by 10.

It's a bit skimpy, at a pinch you could compare with other close members of the homologous series for which more data is available.

 

Does this help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, studiot said:

This is from the 15 th Edition of Lange's handbook of Chemistry (there are at least 2 newer editions)

2_propanol.thumb.jpg.9104940434ad3f0459a865d09dd1cc76.jpg

 

The units are

It's a bit skimpy, at a pinch you could compare with other close members of the homologous series for which more data is available.

 

Does this help?

 

 

 

This is from the 15 th Edition of Lange's handbook of Chemistry (there are at least 2 newer editions)

2_propanol.thumb.jpg.9104940434ad3f0459a865d09dd1cc76.jpg

 

The units are

It's a bit skimpy, at a pinch you could compare with other close members of the homologous series for which more data is available.

 

Does this help?

Thanks a lot! That was exactly what I was looking for. I only had the 13th edition of Lange's handbook available where it did not say. You really saved my day! Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.