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TNG50 galaxy simulation from big bang till now.

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This is a simulation not an animation. In my opinion it is awesome. 

 

Before scientists had to chose between long, large scale simulations with little detail or short, fine detail simulations.  But with the  Hazel Hen supercomputer in Stuttgart, with16,000 cores running for over a year. A simulation of a cube of space measuring more than 230 million light-years in diameter and has 20 billion particles representing dark matter, stars, cosmic gas, magnetic fields, and supermassive black holes has been generated. The team was led by  Dr. Annalisa Pillepich of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, and Dr. Dylan Nelson of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. 

Two papers have been published and I will link those at the end.

I read about this here.

 https://www.universetoday.com/143977/watch-a-simulation-of-a-galaxy-from-the-big-bang-until-the-present-day/

 

The papers are on the monthly notices of the Royal Astronomy Society and are linked below.

https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/490/3/3234/5556547

And.

 

https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/490/3/3196/5566345 

Enjoy!

I have only watched on my phone but am looking forward to watching on tv in just a bit.

P.S.

I hate that I never get on here to post anymore but I do read very interesting content almost daily.

Keep up the good work!

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An impressive enough feat I won't claim to fully understand. Still, I have some questions: firstly, I was under the impression that dark matter was something that could only be *inferred* from the rotation of galaxies etc. [Not really a question, but I'm still warming up.]

And I thought that the universe at its very beginning consisted only of pure energy, photons. How do they go from pure energy to TNG50 galaxies?

Also, how accurate is simulation which contains only 20 billion particles likely to be when galaxies contain 100s of billions of stars and trillions of atoms?

It doesn't help that when I searched for "TNG 50" I got this:

TNG50.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Star Walls said:

And I thought that the universe at its very beginning consisted only of pure energy, photons.

Energy is (one of many) properties of particles. Each class of particles has different forms of energy e.g. kinetic energy, potential energy.

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19 hours ago, Star Walls said:

And I thought that the universe at its very beginning consisted only of pure energy, photons. How do they go from pure energy to TNG50 galaxies?

At the earliest time that current physical theories can be applied, it was a quark-gluon plasma, I believe. Any photons would not have existed for long (they would have been absorbed again almost as soon as they were emitted). There were no free photons for about 360,000 years.

As the universe cooled, the quarks were able to form baryons and electrons (and other particles) were created by the decay of heavier quarks. And eventually these formed atoms; mainly hydrogen with a bit of helium and lithium. (That is about all the detail I have. And I am not sure it is completely correct). Then the clouds of gas cooled enough to start collapsing under their own weight to form large scale structures and eventually stars and galaxies. Then someone invented the Internet and here we are.

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You have the essentials correct for the thermal equilibrium dropout sequence.

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4 hours ago, Strange said:

At the earliest time that current physical theories can be applied, it was a quark-gluon plasma, I believe.

So the simulation begins some time after the big bang? That makes sense and thank you and Sensei for the replies. However, what I was more interested in was how they delt with the problem of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter. My appoliges if you already explained and I'm being obtuse.

Quote

Then someone invented the Internet and here we are

Agreed. Thank you, Al Gore!

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4 hours ago, Star Walls said:

So the simulation begins some time after the big bang? That makes sense and thank you and Sensei for the replies. However, what I was more interested in was how they delt with the problem of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter. My appoliges if you already explained and I'm being obtuse.

The Big Bang is a process, not an event. We have no way of knowing what happened before the time that current theories apply. My understanding is that these simulations start when the universe is already matter. They kind of have to because we don't know what led to the universe being dominated by matter and so it can't be simulated.

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