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Mordred

Xmas wood project for wife

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We have Aldi by us. I’ve never seen anything even close to router or router bit  there. 

Before routers existed, people would install a profiled cutter into a block plane to make those shapes

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Wow, that is cool. Also looks like a lot of work. That's a lot of wood to remove by hand.

 

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I don't know that brand so have no personal experience with it. I suspect for small jobs it will get the job done just fine.

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You would be better off with a plunger router with a round base as it is more adaptable to a router table and router jig assemblies. Though if your just doing small freehand jobs and don't need a router table that one would be adequate.

Though your safer using one that has two hand mounts for freehand work. ( Better control if you hit wood knots)

Edited by Mordred

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10 minutes ago, Mordred said:

You would be better off with a plunger router with a round base as it is more adaptable to a router table and router jig assemblies. Though if your just doing small freehand jobs and don't need a router table that one would be adequate.

Though your safer using one that has two hand mounts for freehand work. ( Better control if you hit wood knots)

When you say freehand, I'm assuming you still have a guide to follow the edge with ? I'm just contemplating a few end plates, so if I can get a reasonable result, time doesn't come into it. 

I noticed that they don't supply any bits with it, so it's on to ebay once I buy one. I was surprised how much they cost, some of them cost more than that router. No wonder they don't give you any.

I think I would need something like this, but in quarter inch shank :  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2pcs-Carbide-Alloy-Endmill-Router-Bit-Woodwork-Cabinet-Door-Milling-Cutter-Tool-/283610856366   

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Quarter inch is probably right, but you need to check the router as it will tell you what size shanks it accepts.

Cheap router bits work great; they just don't last as long.

If you look at the pic of the router bit in your link you'll see a wheel on the tip of it. That turns on ball bearings and runs up against the edge of the piece you are working on. You set less than half the base of the router onto the piece you are working on (so the bit extends down past the edge of the piece), turn on the router, then move the router into the piece. That wheel will hit the edge of the piece and keeps it from moving past the edge. You then slowly push the router along the edge, keeping it flat on the piece and with enough pressure on the side to make sure the wheel maintains contact with the side of the wood. The direction you move is so that while the bit is turning it 'bites' into the wood, rather than the bit pulling the router along as it turns. With a bird's eye view, if the router bit is turning clockwise, then you would move the router around your piece in a counter-clockwise direction.

You need to be sure to set the depth of the bit in the router correctly. If it is not perfectly set up you will not get the profile cut you are looking for. So make sure you set it then test it on a scrap piece of wood to get it right. I don't think I've ever got it right on the first try.

Hope you can picture what I've said above. I'm sure Youtube has many videos.

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Oh gosh, this thread really makes me want to pick that up as an hobby. But aside from time constraints, I just know I would fail. I have an easier time constructing things in the ~20 µm scale, but anything significantly larger I usually make a mess out of it (mostly because it becomes more freehand).

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One side note if you go too slow you will burn the wood, your speed should be just enough to avoid burning without applying any excessive force. Let the router bit do the work. It should be an easy glide.

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If some of you are bored, try recreating this project:

 

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Clever. Lots of work but. Cool outcome. 

I made my first bow tie / butterfly today to hold together... erm... decorate a splitting piece of live edge cherry... 3 of them, in fact. 

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