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Paul Singh Jr

Sun & black holes

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5 minutes ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Is it physically possible for suns to be a exit point for black holes

What do you mean by an "exit point" for black holes?

Some stars turn into supernovas and form black holes. Is that what you mean?

5 minutes ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Theoretically it makes perfect sense

In what way?

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7 minutes ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Is it physically possible for suns to be a exit point for black holes. Theoretically it makes perfect sense 

You mean that matter entering black holes is ejected through stars at some other point? If so, no that is not somerhing observations and current theories would say is physically possible. 

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Just now, Strange said:

What do you mean by an "exit point" for black holes?

He meant hypothetical "white hole"..

4 minutes ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Is it physically possible for suns to be a exit point for black holes. Theoretically it makes perfect sense 

Sun, similar like other stars, is burning fuel (Hydrogen and Helium), which was sucked and gathered billions years ago during formation of Solar System.

If it would be "white hole", it would have infinite (?) or finite (?) amount of fuel from opposite "black hole".. Which would mean it could exist for much longer time than expected by scientists.

It would break the all currently accepted physics laws.

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12 hours ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Is it physically possible for suns to be a exit point for black holes. Theoretically it makes perfect sense 

GR tells us that when a sufficiently large enough star uses its available fuel, it will go S/Nova and the remnant turn into a BH...GR tells us that this happens because once the Schwarzchild radius is reach [equal to the EH] further collapse is compulsory, at least up to the quantum level where GR fails us. Also the BB is the evolution of space/time/universe from t+10-43 seconds. Anything before that, or anything at and beyond the quantum/Planck level of a BH, can only ever be speculated on. 

Some of that speculative talk revolves around our BB being the arse end of a BH in another universe, and BH's in our spacetime, leading to ERB's/wormholes and other universes.

Wormholes while predicted in the maths of GR have never been realized, and WH's  [white holes] are as far as I know, also in the same boat, with even less speculations about their possibilities.

Here is an interesting rundown here......

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/physics/89-the-universe/black-holes-and-quasars/theoretical-questions/425-what-is-a-white-hole-advanced

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Ghidion hit the nail on the head by that he realized what I ment 

The reason I don’t think it would be a white hole is that light is lost while entering black holes but maybe upon the moment of ejection it is subject to gravity and the light balls up innto a star 

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19 minutes ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

Ghidion hit the nail on the head by that he realized what I ment 

The reason I don’t think it would be a white hole is that light is lost while entering black holes but maybe upon the moment of ejection it is subject to gravity and the light balls up innto a star 

We know how stars form: cloud of hydrogen starts to collapse, when it is dense/hot enough fusion starts and the radiation pressure stops further collapse (until the end of the stars life).

 

Black holes are formed from stars, not vice versa 

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5 hours ago, Paul Singh Jr said:

but maybe upon the moment of ejection

Nothing is ejected from a black hole once it goes past the event horizon. Past the EH, the curvature of spacetime is so severe that nothing has enough energy to move on a path other than straight into the degenerate matter. 

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Is it known, or theorised, what happens to a primordial black hole that is less massive than the Moon, and so losing mass? Does it go through stages, or just remain a black hole and just fizzle out to nothing?  

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1 hour ago, mistermack said:

Is it known, or theorised, what happens to a primordial black hole that is less massive than the Moon, and so losing mass? Does it go through stages, or just remain a black hole and just fizzle out to nothing?  

Because the temperature is inversely proportional to mass (and the power output inversely proportional to mass squared) it will get increasingly hot as it shrinks. However, the lifetime of a moon-mass black hole is about 1045 years. Near the end of life, this will accelerate and it will explode in an intense flash. Scientists have been looking for evidence of the decay of primordial black holes (with no results so far). 

Handy black hole calculator here: http://xaonon.dyndns.org/hawking/ (you can provide any value and it will calculate the others)

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On 9/10/2019 at 11:44 AM, Paul Singh Jr said:

Is it physically possible for suns to be a exit point for black holes. Theoretically it makes perfect sense 

Generally, for good reason the black hole is thought of as the exit. Oft, imagined is the question, “to where”?

I would reason that over a very long time a black hole losing sufficient mass, still having gravity could be attracted to a sun, but consumed? Stranges post is interesting.

On 10/3/2019 at 4:09 PM, Strange said:

Because the temperature is inversely proportional to mass (and the power output inversely proportional to mass squared) it will get increasingly hot as it shrinks. However, the lifetime of a moon-mass black hole is about 1045 years. Near the end of life, this will accelerate and it will explode in an intense flash. Scientists have been looking for evidence of the decay of primordial black holes (with no results so far). 

Handy black hole calculator here: http://xaonon.dyndns.org/hawking/ (you can provide any value and it will calculate the others)

mistermack’s question is also a good one?

————————————————————————————

I believe that theoretically small  black holes are said able to exist, but how would they interact if they didn’t cease first. A sun generally containing the majority of mass of any solar system would seem a natural target, but I have read that even two galaxies can merge without stars having to collide due to vast distances. How many planet size rocks are moving through the universe not ending up in suns? The universe gets bigger and bigger, things spread out more, and more the odds change.

Planets do fall into suns, But it’s not a given. A recent video suggests that planets can actually exist inside a sun until harmonics of the system cause them to eject. I would imagine that a planet size black hole might do the same if the physical interaction didn’t expedite what strange posted? I have also read that very tiny black holes can exist to no effect. Which leads me to believe that an apparent possible  effect such as a black hole exiting into a sun isn’t a given.

Note - sometimes I stray to far into imagination

Edited by jajrussel
I always have to edit. Apparently, there is no cure...

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It’s possible the recent video I watched exaggerated the planets location. It was one of those live feeds, and now I can’t find the exact video, which annoys me and means I am less likely to ever watch a live feed video again. Note - apparently below the stratosphere doesn’t necessarily mean below the stratosphere, because now I can’t find any mention of such an exoplanet position existing except in terms such as we might use as in  below the horizon. Or, the thought is so new that Google hasn’t  heard of it, no matter how I phrase it. (Sighs)

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11 hours ago, jajrussel said:

It’s possible the recent video I watched exaggerated the planets location. It was one of those live feeds, and now I can’t find the exact video, which annoys me and means I am less likely to ever watch a live feed video again. Note - apparently below the stratosphere doesn’t necessarily mean below the stratosphere, because now I can’t find any mention of such an exoplanet position existing except in terms such as we might use as in  below the horizon. Or, the thought is so new that Google hasn’t  heard of it, no matter how I phrase it. (Sighs)

Apparently I got everything wrong. Apparently they just meant really, really close and my imagination did the rest. Sorry.

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