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Spinning a flat circuit in the flat plane


t686
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I was thinking about the abrupt change in lakes, where you have a distinct cold layer at a certain depth in the summer time.  I thought what would happen if you mix the the water, but have a flat spinner that spins in the plane that separates the cold and hot water (and not spinning as to randomly mix the cold and hot layers in weird folds the other direction).  Centrifigual force would separate the cold and hot, because the hot would move further out in the spinning plane, and then the cold layer would form a bubble that would float up to the surface.

In an efficient circuit, the heat surrounding the circuit, there should be a cold layer right next to the surface (if they haven't found it yet).  I wonder if spinning a computer circuit, in the flat plane like spinning a record, that in this example, heat would be driven away from the circuit, by centrifugal force, and thus you could keep increasing the speed of computation.  The idea is that a spinning circuit may compress random data, not just with the heat idea, but perhaps it is separating something in the data, this is an idea, that repeated compression that normally shows no improvement, spinning the circuit would at some point allow the data to be compressed.  This is not unheard of in experiments, as in making Aerogel, the best insulator, or in making metallic glass, there is a shaking of the autoclave.  But it would appear that they could make a much thinner and more efficient aerogel if the autoclave were very flat, and they spun it at the supercritical stage in the same flat plane like a record, to separate the two phases so aerogel would come out not brittle and be thinner.

I assume that this would actually work if the computation were done not in RAM but on a hard drive, that is, to alter the programming of the compression algorithm to run totally in the hard drive.  The spinning hard drive would impart an efficiency that should allow compression of random data, which hasn't been done before.

 

Edited by t686
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8 hours ago, t686 said:

I thought what would happen if you mix the the water, but have a flat spinner that spins in the plane that separates the cold and hot water (and not spinning as to randomly mix the cold and hot layers in weird folds the other direction). 

Why would you mix it and then try and separate it again?

Why would something spinning separate the different temperatures? More likely it will cause turbulence and cause the layers to mix.

8 hours ago, t686 said:

Centrifigual force would separate the cold and hot, because the hot would move further out in the spinning plane, and then the cold layer would form a bubble that would float up to the surface.

Once the cold and hot water is mixed, it can't be separated again (entropy).

Also, cold water would sink because it is denser.

8 hours ago, t686 said:

In an efficient circuit, the heat surrounding the circuit, there should be a cold layer right next to the surface (if they haven't found it yet)

In an electronic circuit, the heat comes from the circuit and so the hottest air is right next to the circuit.

8 hours ago, t686 said:

I wonder if spinning a computer circuit, in the flat plane like spinning a record, that in this example, heat would be driven away from the circuit, by centrifugal force, and thus you could keep increasing the speed of computation. 

It is much simpler to use a fan to just blow cold air over the circuit and take the heat away. Or, in more extreme cases, use water or some other liquid coolant.

8 hours ago, t686 said:

The idea is that a spinning circuit may compress random data,

Spinning a circuit will not cause it to compress random data.

8 hours ago, t686 said:

I assume that this would actually work if the computation were done not in RAM but on a hard drive

You assume wrongly.

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