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rutholearywalker

A Wired Up Beating Heart is Placed in Water...

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"...the heart is removed from the water and a non-wired up heart is placed in the same tank of water and begins to beat."

Sooo I study osteopathy. I'm really enjoying the course, I get to work in a clinic and first-hand see the treatments implemented and how people overcome their pain through their treatment.

One of my lecturers isn't a qualified osteopath however, they are more like a form tutor come first year guide into science, complimentary medicine and ethics. They're nice enough, though I really don't think they likes any of the work that I've handed in. They also have a high respect for homeopathy and reiki. Don't get my wrong, I'm not going to start being rude about certain traditions (even though watching James Randi videos about faith healer scams makes me worry) but I'm a bit sceptical.

The other day they were talking about the power of water: I agree with them that its an incredible substance, water is life. But they pointed to an experience about a wired up beating heart which was placed in water, removed and then a non-wired up heart being placed in the same water and began beating. They credited to a documentary called "The Memory of Water" but when I go on YouTube I can only find this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILSyt_Hhbjg&t=8s

The experiment here is of placing flowers in water and imaging the droplets around them. It's a beautiful experiment but I can't find anything about the heart. I've googled lots of different combination of words to no avail.

If anyone knows where I can find the experiment they were talking about or have a scientific explanation I'd be incredibly grateful. It's scratching around my brain a bit.

 

Edited by rutholearywalker

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Don't really understand the set-up, but all cardiac myocytes have the potential to be pacemakers: a heart will beat spontaneously without innervation, assuming the right electrolyte balance is maintained in the water. If they are using this as evidence of some property of water i'd consider it a huge red flag, hoisted high and waving vigorously.

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"But they pointed to an experience about a wired up beating heart which was placed in water, removed and then a non-wired up heart being placed in the same water and began beating. They credited to a documentary called "The Memory of Water""

I would credit it to epinephrine left behind by the first heart. Once that "kick starts" the second heart, it will beat on its own.

 

6 hours ago, rutholearywalker said:

Sooo I study osteopathy.

That's fine, but you should be very clear about the range of issues it can actually treat

At best

"The UK's National Health Service says there is "limited evidence" that osteopathy "may be effective for some types of neck, shoulder or lower limb pain and recovery after hip or knee operations", but that there is no evidence that osteopathy is effective as a treatment for health conditions unrelated to the bones and muscles."

At worst "Others have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to suggest efficacy for osteopathic style manipulation in treating musculoskeletal pain."

Both from 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osteopathy

 

6 hours ago, rutholearywalker said:

They also have a high respect for homeopathy

Then they ae, at best, misguided.

https://xkcd.com/765/

 

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14 hours ago, John Cuthber said:

"But they pointed to an experience about a wired up beating heart which was placed in water, removed and then a non-wired up heart being placed in the same water and began beating. They credited to a documentary called "The Memory of Water""

I would credit it to epinephrine left behind by the first heart. Once that "kick starts" the second heart, it will beat on its own.

 

That's fine, but you should be very clear about the range of issues it can actually treat

At best"The UK's National Health Service says there is "limited evidence" that osteopathy "may be effective for some types of neck, shoulder or lower limb pain and recovery after hip or knee operations", but that there is no evidence that osteopathy is effective as a treatment for health conditions unrelated to the bones and muscles."

At worst "Others have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to suggest efficacy for osteopathic style manipulation in treating musculoskeletal pain."

 

 

Great answers, thanks. I'll do more research.

To your second point: osteopaths are very thorough in taking a history before treatment in case referral to an GP or hospital is needed, hence learning about a wide scope of human biology, physiology and anatomy in case of any issues which might arise. I know first hand it works for some people; if you have a mechanical issue with your back that can be addressed via muscle energy techniques, traction and thrusts using different amounts of velocity and amplitude, and then further addressed through massage of muscles, with the best kind of pressure applied to the area dependent on how "tight" the area is. Genuinely, it's a lovely field, heavily regulated and well worth studying. You can look at it in the same sort of field of physiotherapist or chiropractor, though I would argue there are some very fundamental differences.

 

20 hours ago, Prometheus said:

Don't really understand the set-up, but all cardiac myocytes have the potential to be pacemakers: a heart will beat spontaneously without innervation, assuming the right electrolyte balance is maintained in the water. If they are using this as evidence of some property of water i'd consider it a huge red flag, hoisted high and waving vigorously.

This is exactly the kind of explanation. It was my problem with the story that it was so vague as well. Kind regards!

13 hours ago, Carrock said:

Probably they were thinking of this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_memory

IMO this is a classic example of research which cannot or should not be reproduced.

:lol:

Edited by rutholearywalker
Quotation

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