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FreeWill

What is the reason that Energy and Matter present in the Universe?

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Posted (edited)

How did Energy and Matter appear and how are they initially loaded into the system? 

What is the reason that they are present and they do not disappear without a trace? 

 

Edited by FreeWill

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4 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

I would say evolving space(time). Just a huge evolving spacetime could impact(motivate to expand) the concentrated energy and mass in the size of a nucleus. If not what else? 

!

Moderator Note

You did not post this in speculations (and if you had, it would be locked for not meeting the requirements)

You can ask questions, or come up with your own conjecture. Not both in the same thread.

 

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28 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

How did Energy and Matter appear and how are they initially loaded into the system?

We don't know. They may have always been there.

28 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

What is the reason that they are present and they do not disappear without a trace? 

Locally, conservation laws.

On cosmological scales, the conservation of energy is more complex so it is not obvious that energy is conserved in the same way.

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Strange said:

We don't know. They may have always been there.

Does the amount of Energy and Matter changed by time or is it the same amount since forever?

Edited by FreeWill

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Just now, FreeWill said:

Does the amount of Energy and Matter changed by time?

It is hard (maybe impossible) to say. I don't think it is possible to quantify the total energy of the universe because energy is dependent on the frame of reference so you can't just add up the total energy in the universe. And we know some matter is continually being converted to energy (and some energy is being converted to matter).

For example, the photons we receive from distant galaxies are red-shifted (lower energy). But that energy has not gone anywhere, it is just because we are observing it in a different frame of reference from where they were emitted.

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, Strange said:

I don't think it is possible to quantify the total energy of the universe because energy is dependent on the frame of reference

Isn't space(time) is the fundamental frame of reference?

I understand and agree that yet we can not say how big space(time) could be exactly.

15 minutes ago, Strange said:

energy is dependent on the frame of reference so you can't just add up the total energy in the universe.

If I would know the frame of reference could I add Energy up?

15 minutes ago, Strange said:

that energy has not gone anywhere, it is just because we are observing it in a different frame of reference from where they were emitted.

It is the same space(time) continuum it can not go anywhere!

True a lot of mass and energy impacted the photon on the path to Us and the circumstances of recognition is different as well but spacetime is the same (the photon could arrive to Us)

Edited by FreeWill

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4 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

Isn't space(time) is the fundamental frame of reference?

That is not a frame of reference, it is the measurements that are used (in any frame of reference).

For example, two people in relative motion will be in different frames of reference (even though they both use space-time to measure things) and they may each say that a given system have different energy.

In the case of the universe, light from the past comes from a frame of reference that has a different scale factor.

7 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

If I would know the frame of reference could I add Energy up?

Energy is not well defined. Would you add up the energy as you see it? Or as someone at the source of those photons measured it? Or ...?

7 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

True a lot of mass and energy impacted the photon

Nothing impacted the photon (or we wouldn't see it).

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9 minutes ago, Strange said:

Energy is not well defined. Would you add up the energy as you see it? Or as someone at the source of those photons measured it? Or ...?

I would add up the currently observable values of Energy and Matter up ( with the exchange rate counted if that would be possible)

13 minutes ago, Strange said:

Nothing impacted the photon (or we wouldn't see it).

Then why the red shift?

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Just now, FreeWill said:

I would add up the currently observable values of Energy and Matter up ( with the exchange rate counted if that would be possible)

Then you would (I guess) find that energy is decreasing as the universe expands. 

Although, there is the zero-energy universe hypothesis....

42 minutes ago, FreeWill said:

Then why the red shift?

It is the change in scale factor; in other words, just the expansion of the universe (you can think of it as stretching the wavelength of the photon).

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