Raider5678

Dropping out of highschool

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38 minutes ago, Raider5678 said:

So this is a typical thing then correct? Or at least not an uncommon caveat to companies offering to pay for tuition?

It is not uncommon for companies to attach stipulations to tuition reimbursement, such as requiring a certain grade to receive full reimbursement, only paying for certain types of classes, or asking for repayment if you leave the company with 'x' number of years after receiving payment. In my experience, IF payback is a stipulation (it is certainly not universal) it is required if you leave within 3 years or so.

That being said, if they do have stipulations they can not add them retrospectively; that is, you will be told prior to using that benefit. If the tuition reimbursement is not a "policy" and simply something the boss has offered you, I wouldn't bring up anything about 'payback' periods. No point in giving them something to think about.

 

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20 minutes ago, zapatos said:

That being said, if they do have stipulations they can not add them retrospectively; that is, you will be told prior to using that benefit. If the tuition reimbursement is not a "policy" and simply something the boss has offered you, I wouldn't bring up anything about 'payback' periods. No point in giving them something to think about.

Alright, fair enough.

 

Also. I'm 16. Isn't it impossible for me to sign a legally binding contract?

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8 minutes ago, Raider5678 said:

Also. I'm 16. Isn't it impossible for me to sign a legally binding contract?

I believe that is true in most cases but not all. I don't think you can void a contract for "necessities" such as food and shelter. However, I'm no lawyer.

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3 hours ago, Raider5678 said:

Legally, it is.

That is where you are kinda wrong. Folks to treat it differently (including admissions) and there is little you can do about it. Some treat it equally, some not. University of Phoenix is... a risky choice. It is one of the pro-profits and it really does not have a good reputation. Also, it does not seem to be much cheaper than in-state tuition at a regular college. They are trying to improve their rep but while they may be a choice, they are not necessarily the best choice you can make.

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1 hour ago, CharonY said:

They are trying to improve their rep but while they may be a choice, they are not necessarily the best choice you can make.

Any suggestions for an alternative?

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6 hours ago, Raider5678 said:

Any suggestions for an alternative?

don't take the easy path. It seldom takes you to where you want to be.

take it from an old man whos traveled most of them.

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15 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

don't take the easy path. It seldom takes you to where you want to be.

In terms of college.

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3 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

I know... :cool:

Something a little more practical. Like a name...

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Just now, zapatos said:

Something a little more practical. Like a name...

Thats what I was thinking.

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Just now, Raider5678 said:

Thats what I was thinking.

The easy path is to simply supply you with a platitude in lieu of a name. :cool:

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Just now, zapatos said:

The easy path is to simply supply you with a platitude in lieu of a name. :cool:

Basically.

 

The easy path in my case would be to finish high school normally, try to get a scholarship or something, and take out a loan to pay for college and then spend the rest of my life working it off.

The harder path is trying to take a path that doesn't result in that, but is risky.

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Just now, zapatos said:

Something a little more practical. Like a name...

he knows his options better than all of us.

5 minutes ago, Raider5678 said:

Basically.

 

The easy path in my case would be to finish high school normally, try to get a scholarship or something, and take out a loan to pay for college and then spend the rest of my life working it off.

The harder path is trying to take a path that doesn't result in that, but is risky.

1

where do you want to be?

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4 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

he knows his options better than all of us.

I doubt he knows more about his options than the collective knowledge of the Science Forums membership. His query regarding an alternative school being our first clue.

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1 minute ago, zapatos said:

I doubt he knows more about his options than the collective knowledge of the Science Forums membership. His query regarding an alternative school being our first clue.

1

read the subtext.

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15 minutes ago, zapatos said:

Don't speak in riddles.

one of the paths I traveled was to seek permission to travel.

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1 minute ago, dimreepr said:

one of the paths I traveled was to seek permission to travel.

Clear as mother's milk.

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1 minute ago, zapatos said:

Clear as mother's milk.

permission excuse...

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9 hours ago, Raider5678 said:

Any suggestions for an alternative?

If it has to be online look for established unis with a program, such as Penn State. Not sure whether they offer reduced in-State tuition as with their regular ones. Otherwise, a high GPA can give you a scholarship, some may not be as easy or eligible with a high GED. Also take a look at FAFSA. Does your school have an advisor? Talk to them too for in-state options. To save money you can also consider taking credits in community college and then transfer.

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22 minutes ago, CharonY said:

If it has to be online look for established unis with a program, such as Penn State. Not sure whether they offer reduced in-State tuition as with their regular ones. Otherwise, a high GPA can give you a scholarship, some may not be as easy or eligible with a high GED. Also take a look at FAFSA. Does your school have an advisor? Talk to them too for in-state options. To save money you can also consider taking credits in community college and then transfer.

Yeah, I've been talking to the advisor, a few teachers, and a couple of people at my church who've in my opinion succeeded relatively well with the GED thing. Namely, I'm figuring out what they did that others who dropped out to get a GED didn't do. So far the success of it namely depends on one thing, with a few exceptions. That thing being actually sticking with the plan.

 

I'll look into some local(ish) colleges and their online degree programs.

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13 hours ago, Raider5678 said:

Edit: Boss sent me an email explaining that the college course would have some caveats. Mainly that I can't use that degree to work at another company in the related field of the degree for 8 years. He explained to me that's because the cost of the college is quite a bit(obviously) and it's only fair that if they're paying for my education I don't use the education to just go to a different company. He said this is standard for quite a few companies, and I've asked around to a couple of people who work at other companies and they said that it is as well. It sounds fair to me, but that being said I'm 16 and have relatively little experience in this.

This could be part of a larger non-compete clause. You really need to see the legalese on this agreement before you decide. Eight years is a long time for an NCA normally, but I've never signed one related to college tuition before. Remember, this is agreeing that you won't work for any competitors or start a competitive alternative for a period that's half your current lifetime. Make sure you know what you're agreeing to.

You need to know how strict this is, and exactly how it's worded. The big worry is that something goes sour/pear-shaped at this place in the next few years, and you're forced to stick with it because you can't take your skillset elsewhere. Make absolutely sure the parameters are precisely spelled out. Lots of boilerplate agreements can be too general, but can be changed if you voice your concerns reasonably. It's all negotiable until you sign your name.

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2 minutes ago, Phi for All said:

This could be part of a larger non-compete clause. You really need to see the legalese on this agreement before you decide. Eight years is a long time for an NCA normally, but I've never signed one related to college tuition before. Remember, this is agreeing that you won't work for any competitors or start a competitive alternative for a period that's half your current lifetime. Make sure you know what you're agreeing to.

You need to know how strict this is, and exactly how it's worded. The big worry is that something goes sour/pear-shaped at this place in the next few years, and you're forced to stick with it because you can't take your skillset elsewhere. Make absolutely sure the parameters are precisely spelled out. Lots of boilerplate agreements can be too general, but can be changed if you voice your concerns reasonably. It's all negotiable until you sign your name.

Also think about how likely it is that you'll ever work for a competitor. If they manufacture high-end electro-acoustic transducers and you are doing general software development then it may be a non-issue.

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14 hours ago, Raider5678 said:

Edit: Boss sent me an email explaining that the college course would have some caveats. Mainly that I can't use that degree to work at another company in the related field of the degree for 8 years. He explained to me that's because the cost of the college is quite a bit(obviously) and it's only fair that if they're paying for my education I don't use the education to just go to a different company. He said this is standard for quite a few companies, and I've asked around to a couple of people who work at other companies and they said that it is as well. It sounds fair to me, but that being said I'm 16 and have relatively little experience in this.

To echo Phi, be sure about the details and maybe have someone with expertise in labour law look at it. Make sure what it includes (i.e. paying for a full degree, a number of courses/credits, lump sum..?). Typically NCAs cover information and/or expertise gained at your place of employment that could benefit competitors. I am not sure whether a broad ban would be enforceable in the case of a degree. However, some contracts have a clause that you have to pay back tuition if you leave the employer and that is enforceable.

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5 minutes ago, zapatos said:

Also think about how likely it is that you'll ever work for a competitor. If they manufacture high-end electro-acoustic transducers and you are doing general software development then it may be a non-issue.

Most of the non-compete agreements I've seen are geared towards keeping workers from taking processes and internal information to a direct competitor. They're usually only good for a couple of years, since most companies grow and change enough  to make that info less valuable over time. These were also all agreements for sales positions, which may have completely different parameters.

This agreement is attached to a monetary investment in Raider's education. This isn't concern for proprietary information about the company. The owner may not see this as a potential threat from a competitor at all, but rather that he's paying to make Raider a better employee and wants to make sure he continues to be the employer. If he's a good businessman, he'll want Raider to be obligated for as long as possible, to improve the return on his investment. I'm just saying Raider should make sure the clause doesn't restrict him unnecessarily.

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