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Itoero

Xylometazoline

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I take Xylometazoline (adrenaline-like)to open the bloodvessels in my nose. After maybe 6 months of use I started to be warmer when I went to sleep then when I woke up. This was causal related to if I did sport/excercise. My heartbeat is also 'a lot' higher when I go to sleep then when I wake up.

Logic dictates this warmth is related to a 'problematic metabolism', increased blood circulation/high hearth rate.

How can an adrelanine look a like like Xylometazoline cause this?

 

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For starters it looks like xylometazoline is a vasoconstrictor, which is the opposite MOA that you indicate in your post. Am not a doctor, but it sounds like a symptom relief type of drug and I find it odd that you've been using it for 6 months.

https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB06694

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4 minutes ago, Itoero said:

After maybe 6 months of use

You probably shouldn't be using it for that long.

"Use of intranasal decongestants (such as oxymetazoline) for more than three days leads to tachyphylaxis of response and rebound congestion"

from

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyphylaxis#Other_examples
I suggest you check with  your doctor.

2 minutes ago, ecoli said:

xylometazoline is a vasoconstrictor

Good point.

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11 minutes ago, Itoero said:

I take Xylometazoline (adrenaline-like)to open the bloodvessels in my nose. After maybe 6 months of use I started to be warmer when I went to sleep then when I woke up. This was causal related to if I did sport/excercise. My heartbeat is also 'a lot' higher when I go to sleep then when I wake up.

Logic dictates this warmth is related to a 'problematic metabolism', increased blood circulation/high hearth rate.

How can an adrelanine look a like like Xylometazoline cause this?

 

Are you taking this because your doctor told you to? The reason I ask is because UK's NICE says your not supposed to take it for more than 7 days otherwise rebound congestion can occur.

https://bnf.nice.org.uk/drug/xylometazoline-hydrochloride.html

Best see your doctor.

Edited by StringJunky

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On ‎12‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 10:57 PM, John Cuthber said:

You probably shouldn't be using it for that long.

"Use of intranasal decongestants (such as oxymetazoline) for more than three days leads to tachyphylaxis of response and rebound congestion"

from

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyphylaxis#Other_examples
I suggest you check with  your doctor.

Thx for the reply.

I've been taking Nasonex for a couple years when I started with Xylometazoline . My nasal vessels were too wide to breath freely, even with Nasonex.  There isn't much known about my disease by doctors. Most of them have never heard about my disease.

Taking 'supplements ' is essential so I look up as much as I can.

Thyroid hormones regulate cell metabolism and the high correlation between adrenaline release and disappearance rates of T3 and T4 after trauma suggests that adrenaline may in some way be connected to the fall in serum T3 and T4 concentrations .https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3766027https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4044302/

On ‎12‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 11:00 PM, StringJunky said:

Are you taking this because your doctor told you to?

I take this because my nose was too 'blocked' to breath freely. Now I know it's causal related to energy/blood circulation. When I started with Xylometazoline it was winter and I didn't do much. If I did exercise, it might have been sufficient to open my nose.

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!

Moderator Note

I have locked this thread. This forum is not an appropriate place to seek medical advice. Especially if you are self medicating. 

 

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