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rian copper456

computer science

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25 minutes ago, rian copper456 said:

what are the present using programming language in now a days in computer science?

Java, C, C++, R, Python, Perl, Javascript, Haskell, Fortran, ML, F#, Scala, PHP, Ruby, Swift, C#, Objective-C, Bash, sh, Awk, Typescript, Go, Lisp, etc.

 

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1 hour ago, rian copper456 said:

what are the present using programming language in now a days in computer science?

We could classify them by hardware and environment.

1) Smartphones, tablets, smartwatches etc.

Majority Java. Minority C# (Unity, Unreal game engines scripts). Minority C/C++.

2) Windows, Unix, Macintosh, development for individual retail clients

C/C++, C#, minority Java

3) Servers

Majority Java, C/C++, Perl, Python

4) Web development

PHP, Javascript, Java, minority C/C++ (CGI and custom Apache/HTTP server modules).

5) Hardware, Microcontrollers, Microprocessors, IC

Assembler, and bit of C/C++.

 

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15 minutes ago, Sensei said:

We could classify them by hardware and environment.

Great idea. Although I’m not entirely sure about:

15 minutes ago, Sensei said:

1) Smartphones, tablets, smartwatches etc.

Majority Java.

I suspect that is skewed by Android. Most development for Apple and Windows phones is in C/C++

16 minutes ago, Sensei said:

5) Hardware, Microcontrollers, Microprocessors, IC

Assembler, and bit of C/C++.

In my experience (over 30 years in embedded systems) the vast majority of code is C/C++ with a small amount in Java, assembler and other languages

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2 minutes ago, Strange said:

I suspect that is skewed by Android. Most development for Apple and Windows phones is in C/C++

It's simply result of how large is market share of each platform. 88% for Android.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/266136/global-market-share-held-by-smartphone-operating-systems/

In my reply, I was concentrating on languages which have the largest market share, and thus the largest impact on human life (at the moment).

3 minutes ago, Strange said:

In my experience (over 30 years in embedded systems) the vast majority of code is C/C++ with a small amount in Java, assembler and other languages

I guess that depends on size of memory you have in embedded system. When you have plentiful of memory available you can use higher level languages, which can overbloat compiled code.. but if you're running out of memory, better optimize it by hand..

On Arduino we use C-like clone language. Sometimes I am surprised how big compiled output is (the biggest was on "wemos d1 with wifi" (Arduino-clone).. which at the same time had the largest amount of memory... (it can be programmed remotely through WiFi without plugging it to the computer) ). I believe so, intelligent and competent assembler programmer could optimize its size, better than C/C++ compiler, as I used to in early '80 and '90 years, when we had very tight limits on 8 bit microcomputers.

While watching compiled and disassembled C/C++, sometimes I want to facepalm, what compiler did.. In '90 not once we were writing to C/C++ compiler-author that his compiler is generating the wrong code in some circumstances (especially when optimizations are turned on).. Today it's not possible because they're unknown by name, too quickly changing jobs, behind wall of incompetent managers and staff who prevent direct contact with developers etc. etc.

 

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