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Can science prove God ?

Science proves God?  

15 members have voted

  1. 1. Science proves or increases the chance for a God to exist?

    • Yes
    • No
    • Don't know
      0
    • Is something that science can't properly explain
    • Science disproves God
      0


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30 minutes ago, Silvana said:

There have been studies trying to prove whether or not payers work as well as studies trying to prove the existence of God. 

This article flips it, and asks if there is a science to prayers? I don't think there is a concrete answer to either question.

 

The studies? :huh: There is...

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50 minutes ago, Silvana said:

There have been studies trying to prove whether or not payers work

I assume they concluded that there was a placebo effect?  I also assume that 'the faithful' would have a slight increase of perceived positive answers to prayer based on further placebo through stronger belief and maybe a touch of Pareidolia with some good old wishful thing and maybe some misunderstanding of probability?  What did they find? 

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4 hours ago, Silvana said:

What would it take to convince a skeptic to believe

Evidence?

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3 hours ago, DrP said:

I assume they concluded that there was a placebo effect?  I also assume that 'the faithful' would have a slight increase of perceived positive answers to prayer based on further placebo through stronger belief and maybe a touch of Pareidolia with some good old wishful thing and maybe some misunderstanding of probability?  What did they find? 

Actually I believe they found that those who knew they were being prayed for did worse than those who did not know they were being prayed for. They suspected it had something to do with high expectations. Other than that I believe the study found there was no benefit to prayer.

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4 hours ago, Silvana said:

And I would say it is the same for skeptics. What would it take to convince a skeptic to believe, or a believer not to believe?

I think the opposing side of the spectrum is a denier, not a skeptic. A skeptic would be right in the middle between the believer and the denier, on the fence, waiting to come off the fence on the side with the most supportive evidence.

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14 hours ago, zapatos said:

Actually I believe they found that those who knew they were being prayed for did worse than those who did not know they were being prayed for. They suspected it had something to do with high expectations. Other than that I believe the study found there was no benefit to prayer.

That is interesting. Although do we know who the test subjects were?  Although this is more assumption from me I would think it is very complex and you could run the experiment 20 times with different results. There are so many variables.  Are the prayed for believers or non believers? What are their expectation for the prayer to be considered positive. What are they praying for? (relief from a minor ailment or raising from the dead)

 

 

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3 hours ago, DrP said:

Are the prayed for believers or non believers?

I'm not sure about other religions, however, the Judeo Christian religion prohibits them from testing their God. 

18 hours ago, zapatos said:

They suspected it had something to do with high expectations.

I thought it was concluded that the people who were being prayed for were less likely to take their medicine as well? IIRC. I could be wrong.

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22 minutes ago, Raider5678 said:

I'm not sure about other religions, however, the Judeo Christian religion prohibits them from testing their God. 

...convenient that. I guess they put that rule in to avoid embarrassment. ;-)

24 minutes ago, Raider5678 said:

I thought it was concluded that the people who were being prayed for were less likely to take their medicine as well? IIRC. I could be wrong.

I did say that it would be very complex and multiple trials would be needed with blinds etc...  some taking meds some not, some believers some not etc. Repeated for different types of ailments.

Again  -  I am guessing that there could be a placebo.  I had some AMAZING co-incidences crop up as answers to prayer when I was a Christian. Looking at the back of someone from across the room in a church wanting them to experience the same joy as I felt during my 'baptism in the Holy Ghost' I raised my hand like a priest or wizard and prayed they'd have it too...   then watching them throw their hands in the air gasping for breath due to the ecstasy they are in and falling to their knees in tears of joy... happened a few times - like zapping someone with power...  although - this happens all the time in churches so it could have been a co-incidence that they emoted and dropped at the same time I projected my love at them.  They were probably praying for that feeling.  That - or there may be some connection between us  -  I can't explain the Holy Ghost...   A video from Derrin Brown gave some good suggestions I saw once where he gave an atheist the same experience as baptism in the holy ghost...  so I am guessing it is a state of body and mind.

 

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Quote

In the study, the researchers monitored 1,802 patients at six hospitals who received coronary bypass surgery, in which doctors reroute circulation around a clogged vein or artery.

The patients were broken into three groups. Two were prayed for; the third was not. 

The researchers asked the members of three congregations — St. Paul's Monastery in St. Paul; the Community of Teresian Carmelites in Worcester, Mass.; and Silent Unity, a Missouri prayer ministry near Kansas City — to deliver the prayers, using the patients' first names and the first initials of their last names.

The congregations were told that they could pray in their own ways, but they were instructed to include the phrase, "for a successful surgery with a quick, healthy recovery and no complications."

Analyzing complications in the 30 days after the operations, the researchers found no differences between those patients who were prayed for and those who were not.

In another of the study's findings, a significantly higher number of the patients who knew that they were being prayed for — 59 percent — suffered complications, compared with 51 percent of those who were uncertain. The authors left open the possibility that this was a chance finding. But they said that being aware of the strangers' prayers also may have caused some of the patients a kind of performance anxiety.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/31/health/31pray.html

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